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Gourmet Cooking

Gourmet du Village Launches New Recipe Book

 

Gourmet du Village cookbook“Comfort Food” is a conveniently sized 48 page recipe book full of easy-to-prepare recipes. Each recipe offers two convenient ways to prepare; firstly the traditional way from scratch using store bought ingredients; the second, easier method, uses Gourmet du Village seasonings and mixes to simplify the whole process.

“We make the basics in your pantry or fridge taste great,” says Mike Tott, President. “This is the principle we have followed in creating this recipe book. Each of the recipes is for single serve or for a couple; great for couples or students. Recipes included are for breakfast, appetizers, main dishes and desserts. Many use Gourmet du Village Bakers.”

This new product along with the entire new collection of Gourmet du Village gifts can be seen at their showrooms in Dallas, Atlanta, and Philadelphia.

 

Pereg Gourmet Offers Lineup of Beans and Grains

Pereg Gourmet, a family-owned company offering a wide array of all-natural and exotic pantry staples, is introducing a lineup of premium ancient grains, rice and beans that are easy to prepare and ideal for rounding out a meal.

One hundred percent pure and naturally rich in health benefits, the new products include: white quinoa, red quinoa, farro, wheat berries, chickpeas, basmati rice, pearl couscous, traditional couscous, bulgur, soup mix, black beans, French lentils, Texas chili beans, orange lentils, green lentils, an autumn lentil blend, yellow split peas, green split peas, red kidney beans, and white beans. Of these 20 different varieties, each are completely free of preservatives and OU kosher certified. Most of the new items are also gluten-free certified and non-GMO verified.

PeregPackaged in a stand-up, re-sealable pouch to maintain freshness, each bag measures in at one pound and features recipe ideas on the back. The new grain, rice and bean lineup is now rolling out at select retailers across the country and online. The suggested retail price is $2.99 to $3.99 for everything but the quinoa and $5.99 to $6.99 for the quinoa items. Visit www.pereg-gourmet.com for detail on the company.

Nielsen-Massey Offers Range of Flavors

Throughout its more than 100 year history, Nielsen-Massey Vanillas has earned its reputation as a manufacturer of the finest extracts in the world. The full line of Nielsen-Massey’s Pure Vanilla products include: Vanilla Beans and Extracts from Madagascar, Tahiti and Mexico; sugar and alcohol-free Madagascar Bourbon Pure Vanilla Powder; Madagascar Bourbon Pure Vanilla Bean Paste; Madagascar Bourbon Pure Vanilla Sugar, Organic Fairtrade Madagascar Bourbon Pure Vanilla Extract and Organic Madagascar Bourbon Pure Vanilla Beans.

Nielsen-MasseyNielsen-Massey Vanillas also offers a full line of pure flavors: Pure Chocolate Extract, Pure Almond Extract, Pure Orange Extract, Pure Lemon Extract, Pure Coffee Extract, Pure Peppermint Extract, Orange Blossom Water and Rose Water. All Nielsen-Massey products are all-natural, allergen-free, and certified kosher and gluten-free.

The company is headquartered in Waukegan, Illinois, with production facilities in Waukegan and Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. 

New Cookbook Offers Soda Recipes

An icy, bubbly beverage is just what everybody needs to perk up on a warm day or a hot night. But it probably doesn’t occur to many of us that we can actually make our own at home–with or without a store bought machine – we’re talking from scratch.

soda bookBelieve it or not, crafting a delicious carbonated beverage is easy, according to the author of a new book, Making Soda at Home. Author Jeremy Butler breaks down the science of carbonation which will enable readers discover recipes that are easily adapted for each of the three methods for carbonation. It even walks readers through how to make a soda bar, complete with “kegerator.” Offering resources like homebrew forums, shopping guides, and industrial suppliers, the book provides a resourceful guide for everything soda. Inside readers will find:

  • Coconut-lime or peach sodas for a hot summer day
  • Tonics like root beer, sassafras, sarsaparilla and ginger ale
  • Instructions on how to brew expert clones of beloved favorite dews, peppers, pops, and colas
  • There’s even a recipe for butter beer

In addition, the book offers a comprehensive approach to the craft of soda making with a section on the three major carbonation methods–something that does not exist in other soda making books.

Making Soda at home is published by Quarry Books. Retail price is $24.99, $27.99 in Canada. The book is also available as an e-book.

 

 

La Tourangelle Introduces Artisan Spray Oils

Adding to its repertoire of much loved gourmet oils, La Tourangelle is debuting its Spray Oils set on July 15.

Finding a gap in the market for a healthy, propellant-free, all-natural spray oil product, CEO of La Tourangelle Matthieu Kohlmeyer decided it was time for the brand to introduce its wildly successful oils in a new design. Kohlmeyer notes, “We have loved spray oils for many years, but we had a problem with the propellant loaded traditional sprays available on shelves. We really did not feel like selling our artisan oils blended with 11 percent petroleum product in an aerosol spray can.”

La Tourangelle’s idea is simple: keep the oil, lose the chemicals. The spray oils series will feature the brand’s favorite nut oils in a can that uses compressed air to propel 100 percent oil, enabling users to uniformly spray the product on all of their favorite dishes. While existing cooking oil sprays are renowned for using harmful chemicals as propellant (such as petroleum, propane and isobutene), La Tourangelle’s mission to offer an alternative to at-home cooks who value great-tasting food and don’t want to see “propane” listed in their ingredients is now a reality. Soon to hit shelves will be the Spray Oil Series in the following La Tourangelle flavors: Roasted Walnut, 100% Organic Extra Virgin Olive, Grapeseed, Organic Canola, Thai Wok, and Roasted Pistachio. Suggested retail prices range from $6.99 to $9.99.

Taste the Maple-Bacon Flavors at Stonewall Kitchen #SFFSF14

By Lorrie Baumann

Stonewall Kitchen is showcasing the flavors of maple and bacon in two new products that will put a stamp of excellence on holiday entertaining events. See them in booth #3914 at the Summer Fancy Food Show. Maple Bacon Onion Jam has the sweetness of maple and onions combined with the savory umami of bacon for a flavorful and versatile product. Put it on the cheese tray during the cocktail hour or use it to glaze the dinnertime ham. There’s even a pizza recipe — just use the jam as the base sauce on the crust and then top with cheese. For a super-easy appetizer, pick up some flatbread at the grocery, spread it with this jam and toast it in the oven. That would be fabulous, and there’s no requirement at all that you tell anyone at all how easy that was to pull off.

DSCN0460[1]The other new maple-bacon product is a Maple Bacon Aioli that’s made with canola oil, real bacon bits and pure maple syrup. Try it as a sandwich spread, especially on a BLT, just use a dollop on grilled meats to add some extra flavor, or you could even use it as a dip for fries or vegetable sticks. After tasting it, I can hardly wait to slather it over some chicken pieces, bake that in the oven and serve it to somebody I love.

Stonewall Kitchen is also introducing a second aioli — this one a Cilantro Lime Aioli. Use this one to top fish tacos of other summertime Mexican dishes. Remember that commercial in which the hamster in the plastic ball points out that the dinnertime tacos aren’t going to eat themselves and then the young woman bounces in anticipation? “Oooh, tacos!” Well, that’s the reaction this Cilantro Lime Aioli would get.

The Maple Bacon Onion Jam retails for $7.95, and the aiolis retail for $7.50 for a 10.25-ounce bottle.

Anthony Anderson Discovers America’s Best Food Festivals On New Food Network Series Food Fest Nation

Anthony Anderson is on a mission to discover the most flavorful food festivals in the country on the new primetime series, “Food Fest Nation,” premiering Monday, July 21 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on Food Network. Tasting everything from classic interpretations of regional fare to surprising twists of favorite foods, Anthony uncovers what is truly at the heart of America – one delicious food festival at a time.

“Viewers got a taste of Anthony Anderson’s true passion for food during his appearances as a judge on ‘Iron Chef America’ and ‘Chopped,’” said Bob Tuschman, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Food Network. “Anthony’s love of food, quick humor, and engaging way with people make him the perfect guide through the quirky and wonderful world of food festivals.”

Over the course of eight half-hour episodes, Anthony visits the most unique food fairs in the nation, sampling local specialties and meeting the characters devoted to the regional cuisine. Along the way, Anthony visits the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival in Fernandina Beach, Fla. and highlights delicious classics such as shrimp tacos, shrimp boil and shrimp jambalaya, as well as innovative shrimp ice cream. In one episode, he attends the Magnolia Blossom Festival & World Championship Steak Cook-Off inMagnolia, Ark., where more than 4,000 different kinds of mouthwatering ribeye steaks compete to be the best of the best and for a $10,000 prize. Anthony also visits the Long Grove Strawberry Festival, where over 20,000 attendees flock to Long Grove, Ill. for three “berry” special days of enjoying all things strawberry, including Strawberry Ricotta Ravioli and Strawberry Balsamic Chicken. In another episode, he stops by Ribfest Chicago for a world-class rib-eating showdown that draws top competitive eaters from around the globe.  Throughout the season, Anthony also gets a taste of the South Carolina Poultry Festival in Batesberg, S.C., the Jambalaya Festival in Gonzalez, La., the Blue Ridge BBQ Festival in Tyron, N.C., as well as the Rockwood Ice Cream Festival in Wilmington, Del.

Fans can visit FoodNetwork.com/FoodFestNation all season long for additional video, blogs and photo galleries from Anthony’s travels, as well as connect on Twitter with the hashtag #FoodFestNation.

Anthony Anderson is no stranger to the Food Network audience, having competed on “Chopped” and appeared as both a judge and competitor on “Iron Chef America,” making his transition to host of “Food Fest Nation” a natural and delicious progression.  He is an accomplished actor with roles on both the big and small screen, including more than 20 films and the Emmy® Award-winning drama “Law & Order,” playing Detective Kevin Bernard. His performance on that series earned him four consecutive NAACP Image Award nominations for Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series. Anthony also appeared in the DreamWorks’ blockbuster “Transformers,” directed by Michael Bay; as well as in Martin Scorsese’s Oscar® winning feature, “The Departed.” Anthony can also be seen in the upcoming ABC sitcom, “Black-ish,” this fall, in which he will both star and produce.

Food Fest Nation is produced by Magnetic Productions.

Goddess Gourmet to Exhibit Flavor Bombs at Summer Fancy Food Show

Looking for a little drama at this summer’s Fancy Food Show? It seems you’re likely to find plenty at the Goddess Gourmet booth in the “New Brands On The Shelf Pavilion” on level 1, behind the 3400 aisle, where the company is showing off Flavor Bombs, described as, “an arsenal of ingredients making preparation times shorter, cooking more enjoyable, flavorful and affordable.”

Flavor Bombs are a line of all natural, fresh frozen, gluten free, low sodium cooking bases that ignite a G-force of flavors when preparing memorable meals for family or friends. Flavor Bombs come in five explosive flavors that include Basil, Sage, Rosemary, Mirepoix and Soffritto that turn everyday dishes into gourmet meals. Flavor Bombs are the creation of Giovannina Bellino, a long-time ‘foodie” entrepreneur, mother of three and the owner of Goddess Gourmet, a natural foods manufacturing company located on Long Island, New York.

Flavor Bombs provide consumers with an arsenal of ingredients making preparation times shorter, cooking more enjoyable, flavorful and affordable. Flavor Bombs are concentrated blends of caramelized aromatics and fresh herbs in an extra virgin olive oil base that offers consumers an “EXPLOSION” of flavors and aromas that won’t retreat when preparing their favorite recipes. Flavor Bombs are pre-cooked, so consumers have the flexibility of using them to start or finish a dish.

“We are very excited to be exhibiting Flavor Bombs at the summer Fancy Food Show. We want consumers everywhere to learn how to “drop a bomb” into their pots or pans and be bombarded with the explosive taste of Flavor Bombs,” said Gio Bellino, owner of Flavor Bombs.

The fresh frozen, 2-ounce “Bombs” will create a recipe for up to four people and come in the following five delicious cooking blends:

Basil Flavor Bomb – Recipe ready and no chopping necessary. This Flavor Bomb is the perfect complement to an array of dishes from sauces and soups to meatballs and meatloaf.

Sage Flavor Bomb – Recipe ready and no chopping necessary. This Flavor Bomb is perfect for those fall and winter months stews, soups and stuffing’s. Excellent with poultry, pork, veal and a true enhancer for roasted potatoes and vegetables.

Rosemary Flavor Bomb – Recipe ready and no chopping necessary. This Flavor Bomb packs a powerful punch of pungent flavor and aroma that takes fish, chicken or lamb into the next stratosphere. Try it on roasted potatoes or vegetables.

Mirepoix Flavor Bomb – Recipe ready and no chopping necessary. This Flavor Bomb is a kaleidoscope of flavors and aroma that is a perfect mix for rice, orzo pasta, quinoa or any kind of grain in making a memorable side dish. Try it in tuna, chicken or egg salad and on vegetables. We guarantee your side dishes will never taste the same.

Soffritto Flavor Bomb – Recipe ready and no chopping necessary. This Flavor Bomb is so versatile and delicious it can be used in sauces and soups, in quiche, omelets, frittatas or stir fry. You can even use it as a Panini spread or a topping for bruschetta and it’s the authentic base for Marinara sauce.

“Flavor Bombs really hit their target at last year’s Natural Products Expo East Show in Baltimore,” said Gio Bellino, “That’s why we are taking direct aim at this summer’s Fancy Food Show to further introduce a larger audience of food industry professionals to the unique potential of Flavor Bombs.

 

 

Economic Well-Being Propels Interest in Spicy Cuisines

 

 

By Lorrie Baumann

As the world’s economy emerges from economic recession, American foodies are ready to launch out from the safe harbor of Italo-American and traditional American comfort food for deeper culinary waters, and all the indications are that this is going to be a spicy voyage. Demand for seasoning and spice is increasing due to the increasing demand for new flavors and flavor ingredients, growing popularity of ethnic cuisines and increasing health awareness among consumers, according to a 2013 report from Transparency Market Research, a market intelligence company.

This is part of a global phenomenon, according to both Transparency Market Research and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, which released a report in 2011 on growing opportunities for small farmers in developing nations to participate in the global spice trade. India is one of the world’s largest manufacturers and exporters of seasonings and spices, and growth in the Asia-Pacific spice trade is riding on the developing spice markets in India, China, Vietnam, Indonesia and Sri Lanka, which have traditionally been net exporters of spices.

FlavorTrends-CS“What’s really changed in the spice business in the past couple of years, Spice 2.0, is that 300 million Indians and 400 million Chinese have entered the middle class and want to eat the food of their cultures. American spice prices have gone through the roof as the Chinese and Indians buy more spice,” said Tim Ziegler, Spice Master for Italco Food Products, Inc. a specialty food distributor in Colorado and the co-author of “Spices and Culinary Herbs” by Tim Ziegler and Brian Keating, a poster presentation designed to aid chefs in creating flavors by pairing spices and herbs from the same culinary family. “India is now a net black pepper importer. It is the most staggering development in the spice business in the past 25 years.”

Spices can be defined as vegetable products used for flavoring, seasoning and importing aroma in foods. Herbs are leafy spices, and some plants, such as dill and coriander, provide both spice seeds and leafy herbs. Around 50 spice and herb plants are of global trade importance, but many other spices and herbs are used in local traditional cooking. There is also an overlap between spices and herbs and plants normally classified as vegetables, as for example some mushrooms that are used as spices in China and Pakistan. Paprika is widely grown by small-scale farmers in Africa, while chiles are widely grown in Central America, Asia and Africa. Cloves are grown in low-lying tropical areas including Indonesia, Madagascar and Zanzibar.

Trade is dominated by dried products. In recent years, fresh herbs have become more popular, and spice- and herb-derived essential oils and oleoresins are sold in large and growing markets.

Pepper, the world’s most most important world spice crop, is grown in areas of South America, Africa and India and some Pacific Ocean countries that have high rainfall and low elevations. Lemongrass is another important herb, and it’s grown widely in the tropics. The leaf is used dried in teas, and the stems are used fresh and dried in Asian cookery. Growing interest in organic food and beverages is also catching up with the market as large amounts of certified organic spices have been introduced to the market over the past few years, according to Transparency Market Research.

This trend is already having its effect in home and restaurant kitchens across the U.S. “If the melting pot is true anywhere in America, it’s true in the kitchen,” Ziegler said. “American cuisine is not roast beef and mashed potatoes and asparagus spears any more.”

Ziegler says that Americans are growing more interested in the flavor profiles that originated in Middle Eastern and southwest Asian cuisines. “I’m a history major and I’m a chef. I sell spices on a daily basis, and increasingly the flavor profiles that even the young chefs are asking me for are increasingly southwest Asian,” he said. “I believe that 3-1/2 million to 5-1/2 million Americans have traveled or lived extensively in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bahrein and the Middle East, and those flavor profiles have come back to the United States, and I think that’s going to be a burgeoning trend.”

New Dehli-born Chef Suvir Saran, Executive Chef at Devi in New York City and Chairman of Asian Culinary Studies for the Culinary Institute of America, says that he sees Americans’ growing interest in spices as an indication that Americans are becoming more mindful about how they cook and eat. “My feeling is that we’ve been a nation that’s reactionary and loves fads and diets and trends. With the economic recession ending, people have become less reactionary, and they’re becoming more mindful,” he said. “Taking Mediterranean or whatever comfort food we were already doing and adding more herbs and flavors and spices will be a way that we can cook and eat more mindfully and also save money in the end. Spices and flavoring ingredients are cheap. They’re wallet-friendly and last a lifetime. They give you great joy and great flavor without spending too much…. As there is more availability for aromatics and spices, we can incorporate these into what we already know and create more breadth and depth in our repertoire.”

Chef Staffan Terje, Chef/Owner of Perbacco restaurant in San Francisco, agrees. “I don’t think food ever gets boring. I never think flavors go out of style. I think that people find new things and discover new things for themselves, whether they’re eating or cooking, but I never think that basil and tomato is going to be boring,” he said. “Chefs are exploring other spices and herbs and flavors that might not be familiar to people. Spices had a place that’s been pretty constant for a long time in different foods, but I see that people are exploring things in the spice realm itself. It’s not so much about the heat of spiciness but about different flavor combinations. You’ll see things like cloves and allspice sneaking their way in.”

“I look at how I flavor my own dishes, cooking northern Italian food, and I look at history. Italians were part of the early spice market and adapted things that came from the East and from the New World,” he continued. “You start looking at old European recipes, and you’ll find some very interesting things – the use of cinnamon, the use of ginger – things that came from the Middle East. It’s not just about chile peppers.”

Chef Hosea Rosenberg, owner of Blackbelly Catering in Boulder, Colo. and winner of the fifth season of “Top Chef,” says he’s hearing a lot from his fellow chefs about their interest in the cuisines of Morocco and Latin America. “Everyone’s familiar with Americanized Mexican, but there are so many regional cuisines in Mexico that have not been highlighted, such as Oaxacan,” he said. “I see a few chefs that are starting to get a lot more press attention that are either from Morocco or have Moroccan heritage. It’s an amazing cuisine, and I don’t think there’s enough attention to it as of yet.”

He is exploring both of these cuisines in his own cooking, especially the tagines characteristic of Moroccan cuisine. “I just love the slow cooking, especially in the wintertime. Slow braises of meat. I have a farm and we raise our own lamb, and I’m always looking for creative ways to cook and serve lamb,” he said. “This type of cuisine really lends itself into turning a cheaper cut, if you will, into a remarkable centerpiece-type dish.”

“Now that it’s so easy to access all these spices, I see people really taking regional American cuisine and applying global spices to them as well to enhance those dishes,” said Chef Matt Greco, Executive Chef at The Restaurant at Wente Vineyards in California. “People are using spices that, not long ago, no one had ever heard of.”

“You’re definitely seeing a lot of that cross between American, especially southern American, with Asian flavors,” he continued. “I definitely see a lot more fermented products. Korea uses so many fermented products in their food. I definitely see those types of influences applied to American cuisine. The past five years have seen a rebirth of southern American food, and that whole movement is going to other areas of the United States that have their own food cultures.”

 

“Spices and Culinary Herbs” poster by Tim Ziegler and Brian Keating is available at http://www.chefzieg.com/ or http://www.mondofood.com/spiceposter.html.

 

Emmi Roth Announces Grand Cru Recipe Contest Winners

Emmi Roth USA, an award-winning producer of specialty cheeses, has announced the winner of its Grand Cru® Recipe Contest for Postsecondary Culinary Students. Caroline Ausman of Burlington, Wis., took top honors with her recipe for Manicotti en Croûte with Brandied Fig Sauce.

The contest, presented in conjunction with the Center for the Advancement of Foodservice Education (CAFÉ), challenged postsecondary culinary students to create a flavorful and creative pasta recipe highlighting Roth Grand Cru, a washed rind Alpine-style cheese crafted in Wisconsin.

Ausman is currently enrolled as a student at the Art Institute of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and is pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Baking and Pastry. She attributes her culinary and pastry passion to working alongside her mother in the family kitchen while growing up.

“I truly feel at home in the kitchen, working with my hands and creating from scratch. This contest was an amazing opportunity for me to showcase what I love doing,” said Ausman. “Although developing the recipe was a tremendous, and sometimes challenging, process, I really learned a lot!”

The panel of Emmi Roth USA contest judges were impressed with the flavor and versatility of the recipe, remarking that the application “takes pasta in a whole new direction” and could be served as an appetizer or a savory dessert.

“We received so many fantastic recipes and were inspired by the passion and creativity shown by all of the entrants. Ms. Ausman’s recipe impressed us for its flavor, sophistication and elegance,” said Regi Hise, Director of Culinary Development at Emmi Roth USA. “We’re always looking for innovative ways to feature our cheeses in culinary applications, and manicotti wrapped in phyllo is a creative and delicious concept. The sweet flavors of the brandied fig sauce balance wonderfully with the savory Grand Cru manicotti filling, and the phyllo adds great texture – the recipe was a clear winner.”

Ausman’s first place finish, out of more than 35 entries from across the country, earned her $2,000 and registration and lodging accommodations at the upcoming National Restaurant Association (NRA) Show, May 17-20, in Chicago. Ausman’s winning recipe will be served at the Emmi Roth USA Cheese 4 Chefs table during the NRA Show.

The winning recipe and photo are available on the Emmi Roth Foodservice website. For additional information about Ausman’s culinary pursuits, visit her blog.

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