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Coffee

White Coffee’s BioCup Reduces Plastic Waste

 

White Coffee Corporation has an innovative new product to be featured at this summer’s Fancy Food Show.  White Coffee’s latest development, BioCup™, is a single serving coffee pod that is biodegradable. Coffee pods from single serve coffee present a growing recycling problem facing many households. BioCup is both compostable and biodegradable with 90% degradation after six months.

With single cup packaging on the rise, buyers are starting to consider the ecological consequences of single use waste in their coffee consumption.  “Our goal is to be the leader in the coffee industry in minimizing its environmental footprint,” says Jonathan White, Executive Vice President of White Coffee Corporation.biocup

BioCup bio-degradable and compostable organic single serve coffee is available in 11 flavors: Colombian, Breakfast Blend, French Roast, Full City Roast, Mexican High Grown, Peruvian, Rainforest Blend, Hazelnut, French Vanilla, Sea Salt Caramel and Chocolate Morsel. Single origin, non-organic BioCup is available in Colombian Decaffeinated, Colombian Supremo, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Honduras Marcala, Kenya AA Ruiri and Sumatra Mandheling varieties.

The Fancy Food show, a hub for manufacturers and buyers alike, celebrates innovation in the industry. The largest specialty food trade event in North America is held at the Javits Center in New York City from June 28-30th.

White Coffee’s “BioCup™” is available in retail outlets nationwide and will be offered in 10-count and 80-count boxes. The 10-count box has a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $7.99. The cups produced will be 2.0 compatible, for use with the Keurig® system and similar coffeemakers.

Community Coffee Company Introduces New Vanilla Creme Brulee Flavor to Coffee Line-Up This Spring

Community Coffee Company has just released a new flavored coffee that is perfect for spring entertaining and an everyday sweet treat: Community® coffee Vanilla Creme Brulee. Now there’s no reason not to indulge in dessert all day.

Vanilla Creme Brulee, like all Community® coffee products, is made from only the top 10 percent of the world’s coffee beans and has been expertly blended to ensure the very best flavor and aroma. As a result, this sweet and creamy blend has all the flavor and satisfaction of a traditional crème brulee— a light, crisp taste of sugar layered on top of delicious vanilla bean custard.

“With dessert-flavored beverages on the rise, we wanted to give our customers another coffee option for morning, afternoon or night,” says Scott Eckert, Vice President of Marketing, Community Coffee Company. “We developed Vanilla Creme Brulee for those of us who crave a high-quality touch of sweetness in our day.”

Vanilla Crème Brulee can be purchased for a limited time in 12-ounce ground bags and 12-count single-serve cups on the Community Coffee Company website and at grocery stores throughout the Southeast region of the United States. For more information, please visit CommunityCoffee.com.

Can Coffee Reduce Your Risk of MS?

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a just-released study  that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015.

“Caffeine intake has been associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, and our study shows that coffee intake may also protect against MS, supporting the idea that the drug may have protective effects for the brain,” said study author Ellen Mowry, MD, MCR, with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For the study, researchers looked at a Swedish study of 1,629 people with MS and 2,807 healthy people, and a U.S. study of 1,159 people with MS and 1,172 healthy people. The studies characterized coffee consumption among persons with MS one and five years before MS symptoms began (as well as 10 years before MS symptoms began in the Swedish study) and compared it to coffee consumption of people who did not have MS at similar time periods. The study also accounted for other factors such as age, sex, smoking, body mass index, and sun exposure habits.

The Swedish study found that compared to people who drank at least six cups of coffee per day during the year before symptoms appeared, those who did not drink coffee had about a one and a half times increased risk of developing MS. Drinking large amounts of coffee five or 10 years before symptoms started was similarly protective.

In the US study, people who didn’t drink coffee were also about one and a half times more likely to develop the disease than those who drank four or more cups of coffee per day in the year before symptoms started to develop the disease. “Caffeine should be studied for its impact on relapses and long-term disability in MS as well,” said Mowry.

The study was supported by the Swedish Medical Research Council, the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg, AFA, and Swedish Brain Foundations, the Swedish Association for Persons with Neurological Disabilities and the U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Institute on Aging.

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