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Condiments and Sauces

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Beaverton Foods Wins Four Gold Medals at World-Wide Mustard Competition

Oregon’s 87-year-old specialty condiment manufacturer took home a grand total of eight awards; four of them gold medals – at the 21st annual World-Wide Mustard Competition. The event involved more than 100 judges at the National Mustard Museum in Middleton, Wisconsin. The global competition has included entries from as far away as Japan, Greece and Sweden.

Barry Levenson, curator of the National Mustard Museum, noted in an email: “The rest of the world is ‘yellow with envy’ of Beaverton’s long dominance at the World-Wide Mustard Competition.”

Beaverton imageBeaverton won gold medals for Inglehoffer Sweet Hot Mustard in the Sweet Hot category, Inglehoffer Ghost Pepper Mustard in the Pepper Hot (Scorching Hot) category, Inglehoffer Hot Horseradish Mustard in the Horseradish/Wasabi category and Beaver Cranberry Mustard in the Fruit category. The company was awarded silver medals for Beaver Brand Dusseldorf Mustard in the Classic Hot category and Inglehoffer Horseradish Wasabi Mustard in the Horseradish/Wasabi category and bronze medals for Inglehoffer Sweet Hot Mustard in the Pepper Hot (Mild to Medium) category and Inglehoffer Creamy Dill in the Herb/Veggie category.

Domonic Biggi, CEO of Beaverton Foods, said the fourth generation family-owned and operated company is proud to be a long-time participant in the renowned international mustard competition. “It’s humbling to say we have won more than 150 medals at this annual competition,” he said. “We are especially pleased that our new Inglehoffer Ghost Pepper Mustard was selected for a gold medal. Additionally, we’re grateful that culinary experts around the world like our products.”

The annual competition is open to all commercial mustard producers and agents worldwide. There are 16 flavor categories of which there are gold, silver and bronze awards given to the contestants. Since 1995, judges consisting of chefs, food writers and mustard aficionados have blind tasted the mustards in the competition.

Victoria Fine Foods Sauces at Sur La Table

Victoria Fine Foods and Sur La Table are launching a new line of artisanal pasta sauces created exclusively for the Sur La Table customer.The line consists of the following five varieties:

  • Organic Pomodoro Sauce
  • Fra Diavolo Sauce
  • Roasted Garlic Sauce
  • Vodka Sauce
  • Chianti Marinara Sauce

All sauces come in 24-ounce jars and are available in Sur La Table stories nationwide, as well as on the Sur La Table website and catalog. The suggested retail price is $12-$13. All sauces, except the Vodka variety, are Non-GMO Project verified.

Just like Victoria’s premium and Organic sauce lines, the Sur La Table artisanal sauces are made with just a handful of ingredients which are featured prominently on the front of the label: ripe plum tomatoes, fresh onions, fresh garlic, fresh basil, olive oil and salt. No artificial flavors or colors are ever added.

The Sur La Table artisanal pasta sauces owe their rich flavor to the superb quality of the tomatoes and a slow kettle-cooking process. The San Marzano-style plum whole tomatoes are grown in the volcanic soil of coastal Italy, long considered the source of the world’s finest tomatoes, and slow cooked them in small batches with fresh, hand picked basil, fresh garlic, and fresh onions.

“This is Victoria Fine Foods’ first co-branded partnership, and we are thrilled to be launching this venture with Sur La Table,” says Tim Shanley, CEO, Victoria Fine Foods.  “Our brands and mission are very similar, with a focus on the highest quality, best-tasting ingredients and the desire to help consumers achieve kitchen victories every day.”

Consumers Seeking Healthy Condiments

By Greg Gonzales

Not all condiments were created equal. Consumers increasingly seek alternatives to condiment cornerstones high in sodium or high-fructose corn syrup, or that fail to meet their specific health and diet needs. Producers have responded directly by releasing products that meet individual consumer needs, and some naturally healthy condiments need no alteration.

Of course, a healthy condiment isn’t necessarily the same item for everyone. “It’s more complex than most people think,” said Chrissy Weiss, a nutrition expert who serves as Director of Marketing and Communications at Culinary Collective. “We all are following different diets. Some have health issues, some are athletes, so it depends on someone’s needs individually. … Make sure the product falls in line with your own health goals.” Those goals might include non-GMO products, gluten-free, no high-fructose corn syrup, low sugar, low sodium or vegan.

There’s a condiment for every consumer need. Annie’s, Portland and Sir Kensington’s ketchups do away with fillers like corn syrup and artificial colors, and the organic tomatoes they use contain more nutrients and antioxidants than their non-organic counterparts. The Not Ketchup brand adds a paleo-friendly option to the mix with its fruit ketchups, available in specialty flavors like Blueberry White Pepper and Tangerine Hatch Chile. The winner of the free-from badge contest might have to go to Primal Kitchen for its take on mayonnaise, made with avocado oil. This gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free, canola-free, non-GMO spread made with cage-free eggs is packed with healthy fats and is paleo-friendly. Hampton Creek’s spread, Just Mayo, is also Non-GMO Project Verified, but brings mayo back to the vegan crowd by taking the eggs out entirely — in four specialty flavors, too. And consumers who want flavorful ribs without the sugar rush might try Dinosaur Bar-B-Que Sensuous Slathering Sauce. It’s a gluten-free and all-natural take on the tangy-sweet stuff, with only 154mg of sodium and 5 grams of sugar per serving. It’s not alone on the shelf, either. Tessemae’s All Natural BBQ Sauce contains only 2 grams of sugar and 125mg of sodium. It’s also gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan and paleo-friendly.

“People are reading more ingredient labels these days to see if it’s just simple,” said Weiss. “Used to be a long time ago, we wanted everything fat free.” But these days, consumers know good fats are essential to a healthy diet, and can even lower cholesterol. Culinary Collective’s gluten-free Matiz Catalan All I Oli Garlic Spread, made from sunflower oil, garlic, lemon juice and salt, is high in good fats but dairy-free, low in sodium and sugar. Salsas, guacamole, hot sauces and low-sugar chutneys also make nutritious additions to healthy meals.

“A lot of people believe traditional foods made from scratch, made from high-quality ingredients, can be helpful,” said Weiss, adding that this attitude has been a given in the specialty food industry from the get-go. “We’ll be part of the solution, not the problem.… There’s a lot of products out there that are, honestly, just junk. They don’t add anything to consumers’ diets, and producers are starting to wake up to that. We’ll definitely see this continue.”

Red Duck Foods Flies East

Red Duck Foods has just launched its cocktail sauce at all East Coast Wegmans. The cocktail sauce stays true to its roots with an epicurean edge and the recipe honors the purity of the bounty of the ocean. Crafted with fresh horseradish and a unique spice blend, the cocktail sauce is balanced with a splash of lemon juice that brings out the best flavors in your favorite seafood.

Oregon condiment maker Red Duck Foods was founded in Eugene, Oregon, though now located in Portland, Oregon, by three University of Oregon students on the belief that regular condiments didn’t cut the mustard. Red Duck Ketchup, the company’s first product line, dares to elevate the popular condiment by using high-quality, organic ingredients. With five inventive flavors including, Original, Smoky, Spicy, Curry and a rotating seasonal flavor, Red Duck Ketchup complements dishes from burgers and fries to grilled lamb and baked oysters. In 2015, Red Duck expanded its product list and introduced cocktail sauce to the condiments line. Red Duck’s products focus on using honest ingredients while providing a unique twist on familiar flavors.

From Farm to Flavor with Tres Hermanas

 

In the sunburned heart of southern New Mexico, the Tres Hermanas Mountains rise from the horizon. Nearby, in the town of Deming, family homes, local business, and acres and acres of pepper farms sprawl out in their protective shadow. It is from these mountains that Tres Hermanas takes its name. It is from this community where Tres Hermanas is inspired.

Mizkan editTres Hermanas believes that great flavor comes from great farms. This is why the company works diligently alongside farmers that have grown peppers for generations. Together, Tres Hermanas and its farmers cultivate the very best seeds and ideal growing conditions to raise delicious, uniquely New Mexican peppers. All jalapenos, green chiles and tomatillos are grown within a 30-mile radius of the company’s headquarters to ensure maximum farm-to-flavor freshness.

Each fall, these peppers are harvested by hand, with each one carefully considered to ensure that only the best New Mexican peppers make it to your shelves – and your shoppers’ tables. The farmers and their families celebrate this pepper harvest by making a whirlwind of sauces and salsas, bringing age-old family recipes to life with flavorful fresh ingredients.

Tres Hermanas brings these traditional recipes to you with a full line of peppers and sauces. These peppers fill dishes with raw desert spices. Sauces run from sunset red to verdant green. All are imbued with a touch of something special that sparks the senses, something that transports anyone who enjoys their flavor from their dining room to a sun-soaked plain outside Deming, where three gentle peaks rise to kiss the turquoise sky.

Inspired by the vivid flavors this community has enjoyed for generations, these cooking sauces make it easy to create truly authentic Mexican meals in only a few simple steps.

So whether your shoppers enjoy spicy peppers, authentic sauces or both, everyone will love the dips, enchiladas, nachos, tacos, burritos and even pizzas they can make with the bold, farm-raised flavor of Tres Hermanas.

 

Miso Making Strides in Sauces

 

By Micah Cheek

Miso, the salty, umami-rich soybean paste, is getting attention as an ingredient in premade sauces. Yurika Masukawa, Vice President of Hikari Miso, suggests that miso sauces are gaining popularity in the American market due to America’s renewed interest in fermented foods. “The American market has had kind of a boom in fermented products,” she adds. Miso, made by inoculating ground soybeans and grains with microbial cultures, can be aged for years before use, yielding a fermented funk and umami meatiness. These flavors make miso a complex addition to sauces. Mary O’Donnell, owner of Terrapin Ridge Farms, who makes Ginger Miso and Honey Dressing, says, “The miso adds a nice richness to the flavor profile. It’s really well balanced.”

In its pure state, miso is a probiotic food, but it should be noted that while premade miso sauces carry the flavor and enzymes of the fermentation process, many are pasteurized for shelf stability and do not contain active cultures. One exception to this is So Good Food’s Miso Mayo, which still contains living cultures. Due to the active fermentation process, Miso Mayo can be left at room temperature for up to a week without spoiling.

The rising attention on miso has been apparent at Hikari Miso, where business has been increasing. Masukawa attributes this to the greater interest in the United States and Europe. This growing enthusiasm has made Ginger Miso and Honey Dressing one of Terrapin Ridge’s best sellers. O’Donnell has seen more miso sauces like hers appearing on store shelves recently as well. Smith has noticed that her Miso Mayo has better sales in stores where miso products are already sold. “If you’re someone who regularly eats natural food, or you’re a gourmand, you already know what miso is.” Smith adds that customer awareness is still an issue when selling miso products. “I’d say only right now the public is catching up with it.”

Many miso sauces come with long lists of suggested uses. ”You can dip it, toss it, drizzle it, anything you might use a spread, dip or marinade for. This is a great flavor enhancer,” says Janet Smith, founder of So Good Foods, about Miso Mayo. Meat marinades are a commonly suggested use. The salty and savory elements of miso sauces give a boost of flavor to chicken and fish, and vegetables can be tossed in it to create a light glaze. O’Donnell suggests Ginger Miso and Honey Dressing as a finishing sauce for steamed vegetables like green beans. “It also is terrific if you want to do an Asian slaw,” she adds. Miso also mixes well with spicy flavors. The blend of miso with roasted jalapenos and ginger earned So Good Foods’ Spicy Red Pepper Miso Mayo second place in the Hot Pepper Awards’ Mayo category in 2014.

 

The Italian Sauces for Consumers Who Don’t Trust Processed Foods

 

By Lorrie Baumann

The federal Food and Drug Administration has announced that it proposes to require that nutrition fact labels on packaged foods include a declaration of added sugars “to provide consumers with information that is necessary to meet the dietary recommendation to reduce caloric intake from solid fats and added sugars,” according to the agency’s announcement published in the Federal Register in March, 2014. If and when that proposal becomes a federal requirement, the labels on Uncle Steve’s Italian sauces will report that the sauces contain the same amount of added sugars they always have – zero.

The recipes for the sauces came from Steve Schirrippa, actor, author and creator of the sauces, who’s better known as his character, Bobby Baccalieri on the hit television show “The Sopranos.” He got the recipe from his mother, who has since passed away, Scarpinito says. “Steve wanted to pay a tribute to his mother. Abundant home cooked Sunday family meals were very important to her. Steve honored her by producing products he got from her recipes to keep the Sunday tradition alive.”

None of the three varieties of Uncle Steve’s sauces: Marinara, Tomato with Basil and Arrabiata, contain any added sugar, a common ingredient in other prepared pasta sauces. They also contain no GMOs or gluten, and they’re organic. That’s at the insistence of Schirripa’s wife Laura, who’s a marathon runner conscious of healthy eating and who told her husband that if he wanted to make and sell tomato sauce, he needed to be sure that it would be good for people as well as enjoyable, says Uncle Steve’s Italian Specialties Chief Operating Officer Joseph Scarpinito, Jr.:“If you were to line up all of the popular tomato sauces and then remove the ones with pesticides, tomato paste, puree, and added sweetener, you’d be left with only one—Uncle Steve’s.”

Uncle Steve’s is simmered on our stove for six hours. The only sugar in our sauce comes from organic tomatoes imported from Italy and organic onions. Quality is of the utmost important to us,” he added.

The sauces were launched just last year on the company’s website and quickly picked up by Whole Foods Northeast. Other markets along the East Coast followed.

This year, Scarpinito is concentrating on expanding distribution of the sauces to the Southeast, Southwest and West Coast. “That expansion has already started – the sauce has been picked up by the Albertson’s Boise division and by Gelson’s in Los Angeles,” he said. “The sauce is also available from several distributors servicing large independent retailers.”

New products are also under development, including olive oil, pasta and other flavored pasta sauces. Scarpinito is naturally a little coy about pinning them down with any more detail than that, but he did offer a hint: we can expect to see an Uncle Steve’s vodka sauce early next year.

Once the FDA’s proposal is finalized, the FDA wants to give the food industry two years to switch to the new labels. In addition to requiring a declaration for added sugars, the FDA is also proposing a new format for the label that would make calories, serving sizes, and percent daily value figures more prominent. Serving sizes would be changed to reflect the amounts reasonably consumed in one eating occasion. “People are generally eating more today than 20 years ago, so some of the current serving sizes, and the amount of calories and nutrients that go with them, are out of date,” according to the FDA.

This story was originally published in the August 2015 issue of Gourmet News, a publication of Oser Communications Group.

 

The Italian Sauces for Consumers Who Don’t Trust Processed Foods

 

By Lorrie Baumann

The federal Food and Drug Administration has announced that it proposes to require that nutrition fact labels on packaged foods include a declaration of added sugars “to provide consumers with information that is necessary to meet the dietary recommendation to reduce caloric intake from solid fats and added sugars,” according to the agency’s announcement published in the Federal Register in March, 2014. If and when that proposal becomes a federal requirement, the labels on Uncle Steve’s Italian sauces will report that the sauces contain the same amount of added sugars they always have – zero.

The recipes for the sauces came from Steve Schirrippa, actor, author and creator of the sauces, who’s better known as his character, Bobby Baccalieri on the hit television show “The Sopranos.” He got the recipe from his mother, who has since passed away, Scarpinito says. “Steve wanted to pay a tribute to his mother. Abundant home cooked Sunday family meals were very important to her. Steve honored her by producing products he got from her recipes to keep the Sunday tradition alive.”

None of the three varieties of Uncle Steve’s sauces: Marinara, Tomato with Basil and Arrabiata, contain any added sugar, a common ingredient in other prepared pasta sauces. They also contain no GMOs or gluten, and they’re organic. That’s at the insistence of Schirripa’s wife Laura, who’s a marathon runner conscious of healthy eating and who told her husband that if he wanted to make and sell tomato sauce, he needed to be sure that it would be good for people as well as enjoyable, says Uncle Steve’s Italian Specialties Chief Operating Officer Joseph Scarpinito, Jr.:“If you were to line up all of the popular tomato sauces and then remove the ones with pesticides, tomato paste, puree, and added sweetener, you’d be left with only one—Uncle Steve’s.”

Uncle Steve’s is simmered on our stove for six hours. The only sugar in our sauce comes from organic tomatoes imported from Italy and organic onions. Quality is of the utmost important to us,” he added.

The sauces were launched just last year on the company’s website and quickly picked up by Whole Foods Northeast. Other markets along the East Coast followed.

This year, Scarpinito is concentrating on expanding distribution of the sauces to the Southeast, Southwest and West Coast. “That expansion has already started – the sauce has been picked up by the Albertson’s Boise division and by Gelson’s in Los Angeles,” he said. “The sauce is also available from several distributors servicing large independent retailers.”

New products are also under development, including olive oil, pasta and other flavored pasta sauces. Scarpinito is naturally a little coy about pinning them down with any more detail than that, but he did offer a hint: we can expect to see an Uncle Steve’s vodka sauce early next year.

Once the FDA’s proposal is finalized, the FDA wants to give the food industry two years to switch to the new labels. In addition to requiring a declaration for added sugars, the FDA is also proposing a new format for the label that would make calories, serving sizes, and percent daily value figures more prominent. Serving sizes would be changed to reflect the amounts reasonably consumed in one eating occasion. “People are generally eating more today than 20 years ago, so some of the current serving sizes, and the amount of calories and nutrients that go with them, are out of date,” according to the FDA.

 

A Sauce Republicans and Democrats Can Agree On

Sapore Oil and Vinegar, LLC. Co-Founders Renee and John Farr launch Bipartisan Barbecue Sauce into the Washington, DC Political arena.

After years of enduring bickering and disagreements, the Washington, DC market needed something that both parties —  Republicans and Democrats — could agree upon: a great-tasting barbecue sauce made with fresh ingredients, with a little spice and a lot of humor. So says Renee Farr, Co-founder of Sapore Oil and Vinegar on Capitol Hill and creator of their new product, Bipartisan Barbecue Sauce. The former catering sales manager first used her ingenuity to spice up Capitol Hill with a line of spices and gourmet foods sold exclusively at her retail store.

farr sauce“We wanted a sauce that was a little different, but that still met our high standards of flavor. So we went big – big on flavor and big on political satire,” Farr said. The bottle label suggests you use the sauce “liberally or conservatively,” but diplomatically adds, “Independents will like it too!”

“Not only does it take a light hearted poke at Capitol Hill, but it’s addictively delicious. Bipartisan Barbecue Sauce is a tomato/molasses-based sauce with a kick of ancho chiles and chipotle. It’s especially good on pork and beef, and takes grilled chicken and shrimp to whole new level.”

“My husband, [Co-founder] John Farr and I sourced an amazing product and designed the branding. We’re initiating a homegrown campaign to market this product in the Washington D.C. area. Thanks to that effort, you will find Bipartisan Barbecue Sauce in other local stores beside Sapore this summer,” Farr said.

The sauce is available in one variety: Original Bipartisan Barbecue Sauce, 16 ounces, retailing for $9.95

All-American Mustard Girl Cutting the Mustard

By Lorrie Baumann

The Real Mustard GirlJennifer Connor isn’t one of those little girls who grew up always knowing exactly what she wanted to do for the rest of her life, and whatever her passing dreams were, they didn’t include becoming the Founder, President and Chief Mustard Officer of Mustard Girl All-American Mustards. “I never thought I would ever get into mustard. Nevertheless, when I was little, I always loved the color yellow. I also always loved cooking and loved mustard, growing up and so the seeds were planted,” she says. “I knew there was something out there for me. I always knew that if you follow your heart and believe in it, you’ll end up somewhere.”

Then she tasted Mr. Rendall’s mustard while she was a freshman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It’s not too much to say she fell in love with it. At the time, she was an art history major thinking about pursuing a career in advertising. She graduated from college, and she did that for a while, but then she heard that Rendall was planning to retire, taking his recipes with him.

Connor tracked him down and begged him to sell her his recipes as she couldn’t imagine the world without them. “I asked him if I could help him grow his company. He said no, you’re just an art history major. They’ll eat you alive out there; it’s too competitive,” she says. She asked him for a week to gather her resources and figure out how to run a mustard company before he made his final decision. Then she drove up to her family’s cabin in northern Wisconsin to think. “I was looking for a sign, if this was the right thing to do- so asked my higher power for a rainbow or a shooting star,” she says. “But to my dismay, It rained all weekend.”

On Sunday morning, she attended the little countryside church nearby still looking for a final sign. “I thought to myself if the father says yellow during the sermon, than that would be my sign. If not, then maybe this mustard journey was not meant to be.” The father didn’t mention the color yellow; however, he did say that we all have times of doubt in our lives, and when we doubt, we just have to remember the parable about the faith of the mustard seed. “I almost fell off my pew,” Connor says. “I’d never heard the parable. There was a nice lady in church who held my hand and told me the story of the mustard seed. I cried and hugged her, and everyone left the church, and I thanked my Higher Power for the best sign I could ever get, and at that moment made a promise to spread ‘mustard sunshine’ across America and inspire and help others along the way too.”

Connor called Rendall immediately and told him the story. “He said that, ‘I don’t want to be struck by lightning,’ but he was just waiting for someone who’d have enough love to stick with it, and I did. He told me that I’d probably lose my shirt three times, which I did, but I never gave up,” she says. “It changed my whole life. It’s all about believing in yourself. I wanted the whole world to have the opportunity to have that goodness.”

Rendell agreed to spend five days with Connor teaching her everything he could about the business in that length of time. The two met in a Starbucks coffee shop from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day, and finally, Rendell turned over the yellow pieces of paper that contained his mustard recipes and his sales records for the customers who’d been buying from him. “He gave me the building blocks to help me get started to where I am today,” she says.

That was in 2006, and Connor spent the next two years trying to practice everything Rendell had taught her while she improved the recipes and found a co-packer who could attend to production while she made the sales. When she moved production to the co-packer in 2008, just in time for the American economy to take a nosedive, she decided to change the name of her company to Mustard Girl. “I decided that since I had evolved the recipes and made them my own, we could have a real-life mascot who could be a role model for girls,” she says. “People were calling me Mustard Girl, so I had someone draw a picture of me for the labels and decided to call the mustard, Mustard Girl.”

She put every dime she had into the business, and in the absence of anyone else to advise her about the mustard business, she thought back to what Rendell had told her about how competitive the business was. There were weeks when she didn’t eat much besides rice, beans and mustard. She called on family and friends to help out, a humbling experience that she says has brought her closer to them too. “Going into this, I was very naive. I didn’t know how hard it was going to be and how fierce it was going to be. I got into this at a time when people weren’t spending money on new products, banks weren’t lending and little did I know I was competing in one of the toughest food categories. I was chewed up a lot, but I always knew that my destiny in life was to have faith in the mustard seed. I really needed to believe that. I’m a big fan of Vince Lombardi, and I’ve always remembered what he said about what it takes to be Number 1. I am going to go until I can’t possibly go any more but not never up,” she says. “I also didn’t have the billions of dollars that the other big companies have. I did a lot of guerrilla marketing, a lot of festivals and food shows and demonstrations in grocery stores. I just worked really hard and had a lot of sleepless nights, but never gave up on the faith of the mustard seed or Mustard Girl.”

Mustard Girl assorted bottles hi resToday, Mustard Girl All-American Mustards are still made from ingredients sourced in the Midwest. Mustard seeds come from Wisconsin and from Canada. All the other spices and ingredients come from the Midwest. The honey that’s in some of the mustards is also from Wisconsin. Mustard Girl All-American Mustards are sold in all Super Targets across the U.S., Publix stores in the South, Whole Foods in the Midwest region, expanding to other territories in the next year. Mustard Girl is the official mustard for the burger bars on Norwegian Cruise Lines. Mustard Girl mustards are also being adopted by leading chefs, including the Lettuce Entertain You Restaurants and Tom & Eddie’s. “Kids love the Sweet ‘N’ Fancy Yellow. Men love the Zesty Horseradish. Women love the American Dijon, and children love the Mustard Girl Sweet N Fancy Yellow. Everyone loves the Mustard Girl Sweet n Spicy Honey Mustard and Mustard Girl Stoneground Deli too- a range of flavors for the whole family that taste like a beautiful symphony upon your taste-buds.” Connor says. “I was asked to participate in Aspen Food & Wine Show this June which was a great honor. This is my first Aspen show, which I’m really looking forward to, and did the NRA Show last year, which was a huge success.” The mustards are also medal winners in the World Wide Mustard competition. These mustards are packed with mustard seed, turmeric and spices; they are all natural, gluten free and kosher, with no fat and no preservatives. She’s currently developing new mustards and also some salad dressings that she hopes to bring to the market in 2016 along with a cookbook. “I’m still looking for my ketchup boy too,” she says. “I’ve just been too busy cutting the mustard.”

In addition to running the company, Connor has a busy schedule of community involvement, including a number of projects aimed at improving life for women and children. She works with the Women’s Health Foundation in Madison and with the Ivory Coast Women’s and Children’s Clinic started by a friend of hers. She has volunteered with Common Threads organization started by Chef Art Smith, owner of TABLE Fifty-Two and other restaurants. The organization helps inner-city kids learn to cook and teach them about nutrition in hopes of preventing obesity, and take better care of themselves so they can longer, healthier lives. Make a Wish Foundation of Wisconsin gets donations from her. Madison Children’s Museum too. “I also like going to schools to help inspire children. I go to any class that would like to have me,” she says. “I come in dressed up as Mustard Girl and tell them my story, and we talk about what everybody wants to be when they grow up and make some yummy mustard inspired recipes. The children are our future mustard seeds of tomorrow…. Spreading the sunshine the best you can, inspiring others to believe in their own mustard seeds, and to not give up out there no matter how hard it is, makes life worth it in the end, what a better way to do this than through mustard!”

 

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