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Two New Cheese Products Imported From Italy

 

Ambriola Company Inc. is introducing Auricchio brand Gorgonzola and Mascarpone.

Auricchio’s cheese producing expertise expanded its operations to include Gorgonzola. It produces Gorgonzola Dolce, Sweet Gorgonzola and Gorgonzola Piccante – a natural Gorgonzola. Each wedge is beautifully packaged and individually sealed to ensure freshness.

Auricchio’s world-class mascarpone uses only the freshest cream to produce its soft, creamy and spreadable mascarpone. Customers will appreciate its delicate, mild flavor and how easily it blends with many other ingredients.

The Auricchio brand is a respected name in the cheese industry which is known for quality, premium imported cheeses from Italy. 

 

Traditional Craftsmanship in Appel Farms Cheeses

Appel Farms PFEach batch of Appel Farms cheese is made in the traditional manner using milk from the farm’s own herd of dairy cows. Appel Farms was founded 35 years ago by Jack Appel, who was trained in Europe and brought those cheesemaking skills with him to the U.S. Today, his son, John Appel, takes the milk fresh from the cow and makes artisan cheese just as his father taught him. Controlling the process from the milk source to the finished product ensures consistent quality and flavor, and John strives to maintain that consistency in the cheese while improving efficiency in the process and adding to the line of cheeses.

Appel Farms Gouda has a creamy, buttery texture and nutty flavor. Varieties include Smoked, Mild, Jalapeno, and Sweet Red Pepper. Appel Farms cheeses are available in retail as well as restaurant and food service sizes.

For more information about Appel Farms, call 360.384.4996, email john@appel-farms.com or visit www.appel-farms.com.

 

For more about Appel Farms and other cheeses, check out the Spring 2015 Cheese Guide from Gourmet News, a publication of the Oser Communications Group.

Goat Cheese Steps into the Mainstream

 

By Dave Bernard

Once a cheese of last resort for those intolerant or allergic to cow dairy products, goat cheese has grown in popularity in the last 15 years to achieve mainstream status. With many chefs preferring the bright, tangy flavor of fresh chèvre over creamier cow’s milk cheese varieties, goat cheese is “here to stay,” according to Lynne Devereux, Marketing Manager at Laura Chenel’s Chevre.

The rise of goat cheese involves a confluence of factors, from consumer hunger for more healthful foods to the desire for local and artisan products, a taste-adventurous Millennial-generation consumer group along with increasingly knowledgeable and flavor-seeking consumers in all categories, to the goat dairy industry’s dedication of more resources to education.

Goat cheese’s increasing popularity among American consumers is attributed to pioneering chef Alice Waters, who co-founded the Farm to Table movement of the 1980s and, working with Laura Chenel, intoduced diners at her Chez Panisse restaurant to goat cheese-inspired dishes. The news about goat cheese spread from there. “A lot of famous chefs worked at her restaurant first, and they went on to open restaurants across the country,” explained Jennifer Lynn Bice, CEO and President of Sebastopol, California’s Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery. “Diners would enjoy these wonderful goat cheese dishes, and then go into stores looking for the cheese; and from there it just mushroomed all around the country.”

While consumers came for the flavor and bright white, clean appearance of goat cheese, they stayed for the health benefits. Goat dairy products often work for those with lactose intolerance, and they contain a different saturated fat composition from that found incow’s milk. And it’s also higher in calcium, vitamin A and often protein. Some varieties contain just a third of the fat and calories of cow’s milk cheese. goat cheese got a hoof in the door, and to grow the category.

While the cream cheese-like fresh chèvre, popular in baking and cooking, leads the category, an increasing number of small and some large producers have developed more and varied, quality cheeses, with producers like Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery offering unique varieties like Roasted Chile, Three Peppercorn and Garlic Chive chevres.

Producers have also developed harder, aged cheeses more conducive to snacking, sandwich topping and other uses. Cypress Grove Chevre of Arcata, California, partners with a Dutch cheesemaker to produce the dense and chewy Midnight Moon, a Gouda-type cheese boasting a brown buttery flavor with caramel undertones. Laura Chenel’s Chevre’s rich and nutty Tome is a pale ivory, firm cheese that slices and grates easily; and Redwood Hill Farm’s offerings include Aged Cheddar and Smoked Cheddar.

“When I first started here 15 years ago, we were trying to convince people that goats gave milk,” said Lynne Devereux. “So the trajectory in the last 15 years has been fantastic.”

 

Sartori Cheese Releasing Limited Edition Extra-Aged Goat Cheese

 

Sartori Cheese will be releasing its Limited Edition Extra-Aged Goat Cheese to specialty cheese shops throughout the United States during the months of June and July.  Hand-crafted in small batches using 100 percent goat’s milk, this specialty cheese is only released twice during the year.

Sartori’s Extra-Aged Goat Cheese is made within Sartori’s Italian hard-style tradition.  Unlike a typical soft, fresh goat cheese, Sartori’s is extra-aged for a minimum of 10 months.  “This goat cheese is surprisingly different than what most expect.  When we age this in our curing room, the flavors begin to balance out and in the end the cheese delivers a savory, smooth, and creamy finish with hints of caramel,” shares Sartori Master Cheesemaker, Pam sartoriHodgson.

As with many award-winning cheese, Sartori’s Extra-Aged Goat has a wonderful story of origin.  A few years back this cheese was developed by Hodgson and her team.  “The idea has always been there to experiment with goat’s milk.  Growing up, I was very familiar with goats.  My dad purchased a couple goats to help trim his lawn on the farm and later in life my children showed the animals during county fairs.  When starting with the creation of this cheese, our hurdle was to understand how to craft a hard goat’s milk cheese and stay true to our Italian roots.  We decided to partner with LaClare Farms to source the freshest, highest quality goat’s milk.  From there, we created a hard goat’s milk cheese and aged it.  It’s the steps within the cheese make process that allowed us to continue within our tradition of hard-style award-winning cheese,” adds Hodgson.

Sartori first introduced this cheese in 2012 and received a Gold Medal at the Global Cheese Awards held in the United Kingdom.  Since its inception, Sartori has garnered seven awards for this very special cheese.

Sartori’s Limited Edition Extra-Aged Goat Cheese will be available at specialty cheese shops throughout the United States June and July.  Additionally, a limited supply of wedges will be available for sale at the Sartori online cheese shop,http://shop.sartoricheese.com/.

Burnett Dairy Cooperative Introduces New Snack Cheeses

Burnett cheesesBurnett Dairy Cooperative introduces fun new ways to snack. New String Whips, Artisan Cuts and new flavors of String Cheese will add excitement to the retail cheese case by offering on-trend flavors and convenience to entice cheese lovers of all ages.

String Whips are Burnett Dairy’s award-winning natural mozzarella string cheese in a fun, spaghetti-like shape. They are the perfect snack for kids and adults and are available in Creamy Original and Homestyle Ranch.

String Cheese is a favorite go-to snack for kids and adults. Bringing some fun to the category, Burnett Dairy’s three new varieties of natural mozzarella string cheese are blended with meats and spices to create protein packed fun flavors: Zesty Teriyaki, Hot Pepper Beef and Pepperoni Pizza. These flavors join Burnett Dairy’s Smoked, Ranch and Creamy Original. Each piece is individually wrapped for easy, on-the-go freshness.

Artisan Cuts are flavorful and convenient for snacking, entertaining and cooking. These cracker-sized pieces have a hand-cut appearance in a variety of sizes making them ideal for crackers, sliders and cheese trays – without the cutting and mess! Available in seven fun varieties, each in a resealable bag: Bacon & Onion Colby, Roasted Garlic Monterey Jack, Rosemary Herb Cheddar, Italian Sun-Dried Tomato Monterey Jack, Aged Cheddar, Colby and Fancy Jack. Artisan Cuts are available in select markets only.

Burnett Dairy Cooperative, farmer-owned since 1896, is a place where farm families work side-by-side with crop and dairy experts to produce the highest quality milk, from the ground up. A place where a Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker then creates cheese in inventive flavors and crafts new varieties in limited batches.

B’more Organic Expands into Bigger Baltimore Location

As drinkable yogurts continue to benefit from the growing protein market, B’more Organic, a brand of creamy, no sugar added, Icelandic-style skyr smoothies continues to expand its retail availability and supports this growth by adding three new employees to its team and moving to a new, larger office location in the up and coming Baltimore neighborhood of Hampden.

As B’more Organic increases its distribution throughout the U.S. this summer, the brand has hired new staff to support manufacturing, sales, and marketing. The growing B’more Organic Team now includes Edward Townsend, Local Sales Manager, Denise Midei, Controller, and Amanda Sains, Marketing & Operations Manager.

This larger team motivated B’more Organic’s move to a new office space in the Union Mill side of Hampden, a funky, growing neighborhood in the Baltimore City Limits. Famous for exuding a unique charm and urban vibe, Hampden is home to the city’s hippest restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and art venues, as well as several other food businesses, including Salazon Chocolate, Mouth Party Caramel, and Union Craft Brewery. Native to the Baltimore area and rooted in the city’s urban culture, B’more Organic’s creamy, skyr smoothies satisfy the progressive population who actively seek organic, delicious, and nutritious grab-and-go beverages.

“At a time when Baltimore is undergoing some soul searching about economic opportunities, we hope to be part of the re-stabilization of our city,” says Andrew Buerger, Founder and CEO of B’more Organic. “By leasing space in the city and adding new job opportunities there, we aim to be a part of the solution while helping this city b’more healthy.”

Blended with Icelandic-style skyr made from organic grass-fed cow’s milk, B’more Organic offers quick grab and go, fat-free smoothies each packed with a minimum 32 grams of protein. B’more Organic smoothies are available in six mouthwatering flavors including: Plain, Mango Banana, Banana, Vanilla, Cafe Latte, and newly launched Strawberry. With a flavor for every palate, a highly-skilled team, and new urban offices, B’more Organic encourages all individuals to “B’more Healthy, B’more Giving, and B’more Green.”

Grilled Bacon Cheeseburger from Yancey’s Fancy

 

Yanceys_GrilledBaconCheeseburger_Retouch-015 copySometimes it just takes a little twist on an old idea to make it new again. Yancey’s Fancy has done just that by adding the burger and the bacon to pasteurized process aged cheddar cheese for Grilled Bacon Cheeseburger. It’s the quintessential American flavor, perfect for snacking or for a grilled cheese sandwich.

Yancey’s Fancy packages it in 7.6-ounce wedges for the cheese case and sells 10-pound wheels for the service deli. Suggested retail price for the 7.6-ounce wedge is $8.99/pound, and for cuts off the wheel, $6.59/pound.

 

 

It’s a Scoop! Clover Launches New Cowlifornia-Made Organic Ice Cream Line

Dairy producer Clover Stornetta Farms is launching a new line of premium ice cream made from fresh organic Clover milk and cream. These 12 new, decadent flavors will debut as a six-month exclusive placement in local independent grocers and Whole Foods Market®.

“Giving Whole Foods Market and our independent stores an exclusive, serves our mission to support businesses with like-minded philosophies,” says Clover President & CEO Marcus Benedetti. “Craft ice cream is booming. The farming principles behind our nutritious milk coupled with interesting ice cream flavors and partnerships will put Clover’s best dairy foot forward.”

Each quart is made with organic milk from happy, humane-certified Clover cows living on family-owned dairy farms. Every scoop is blended with the best quality local ingredients to create these new flavors: Chocolate Nirvana (made with fair trade Organic TCHO Chocolate in Berkeley), Straight Up Vanilla, Mint to Be, Hoppy Hour (using Bear Republic Brewing Company’s Racer 5 IPA® from Cloverdale), Cowlifornia Sweet Cream, French Press, Eat Your Milk & Cookies, Strawberry Shindig, Creamy PB&C, Pistachio Perfecto, Petaluma Pothole (in honor of our hometown’s roads) and Tempt Me Toffee (made with San Francisco’s Charles Chocolates English Toffee).

The reveal of Clover premium organic craft ice creams will kick off with in-store samples, signage and a strategic radio campaign with social media messaging, and PR that reflects Clover’s core values of farm-fresh, sustainability, family, animal welfare and superior quality.

Raw Sheep’s Milk Cheeses from the Back 40

 

By Lorrie Baumann

In his fourth season as an artisan cheesemaker, Jeff Fenwick, cheesemaker at Back Forty Artisan Cheese in Lanark, Ontario, doesn’t regret leaving his job as director of admissions at a college in downtown Hamilton. His wife Jenna simply brought her own art and design business with her when they made the move, and although she’s streamlined the retail channels for her line of women’s bags and accessories to accommodate her new rural location, her studio still thrives. “We turned a barn into her studio here when we moved,” Jeff says. “She has a big Etsy store.”

Jeff and Jenna were living and working in Hamilton when his job at the college began to feel a little stale. The couple had always been interested in food, cooking and entertaining, and they’d started growing some of their vegetables. Jeff had gotten interested in fermenting and was making his own beer and cider. “I had made the odd batch of yogurt, but no advanced cheese making,” he says.

Jeff’s job required long hours at the college, and the two of them began to regret how little time they were spending together, too. All those yearnings prompted Jeff to start searching for a chance to leave his office job for a business related to food. They thought of opening a small cafe, perhaps. “While we were researching, this cheese business came up for sale. It’s a beautiful area, and we had some family in the area, and it turned out to be a great fit for us,” Jeff says. “A big part of moving out here was to spend more time together. The college job was very demanding. We weren’t seeing each other a whole lot.”

In business since late 1999 or early 2000, Back Forty Artisan Cheese was one of the first in Ontario to make raw sheep’s milk cheeses. Its former owner was ready to leave it behind but he wanted to leave the business in good hands, so he stayed involved long enough to teach Jeff how to make cheese from his recipes. “I had to learn a whole new art,” Jeff says. “I used his recipes, did some trial and error, made some mistakes. It took a good year to settle into it.”

Milking the sheep is outsourced to a nearby farm where the farmer has more livestock experience.“He has a flock of 200 sheep this year,” Jeff says. “He does what he does best and gives us high-quality milk that we can make good cheese with.”

Jenna handles the marketing and website management for the business, and today the cheese is being sold at specialty cheese shops and upscale grocers all over Ontario, with the majority going to the eastern half of the province, including Ottawa and some farmers markets and small retailers in Toronto. They just added the farmers market in Kingston to their distribution network.

Back Forty Artisan Cheeses makes four products in its regular line. Flower Station is a traditional-style feta. Highland Blue is a natural rind blue cheese that’s flavorful but a little smoother than most blue cheeses, with some extra butteriness from the sheep’s milk. “We’ve had a lot of success with that one,” Jeff says.

Bonnechere is a semifirm cheese, unique because it’s influenced by a Basque recipe. Its rind is flame-torched for a mahogany exterior and a hint of smokiness that gives it an interesting flavor on the rind around a body that’s tangy and a little fruity. It’s aged from three months to a year or more. Finally, Madawaska, a bloomy rind raw milk cheese that’s tricky to make. “It ripens from the outside in, so you get that ripeness right under the rind, with a little firmer body to it near the center,” Jeff says. “Madawaska is frequently back-ordered due to the high demand for this unique cheese and the fact that we can produce only limited quantities.”

Now that Jeff has settled into his new life, he’s growing it too. The couple just bought a new farm in North Frontenac, where they’re building a new facility that they expect to have in operation this summer.

For further information, visit www.artisancheese.ca. For more information about Jenna Fenwick’s line of screen-printed textile products, visit jennarose.ca.

 

Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker Program Announces 2015 Graduates

The Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker® program, the nation’s only advanced training program of its kind for veteran cheesemakers, has graduated two new and four returning Master Cheesemakers. Wisconsin now has 55 active Masters working in 33 companies across the state.

The newest Master Cheesemakers, who were formally certified at a ceremony during the Wisconsin Cheese Industry Conference in Madison this week, are Adam Buholzer, of Klondike Cheese Company in Monroe, and Chris Roelli, of Roelli Cheese Haus in Shullsburg.

Buholzer is a fourth-generation cheesemaker and one of four Wisconsin Master Cheesemakers in the Buholzer family, including his father, Steve, and uncles, Ron and Dave Buholzer. Adam is now certified as a Master for feta and havarti.

Roelli is certified as a Master in cheddar, the variety on which his family’s original plant was founded. Since re-opening the business in 2006, he has emerged as an award-winning producer of artisanal Wisconsin originals, including Dunbarton Blue, Little Mountain and Red Rock. Like Buholzer, Roelli is a fourth-generation Wisconsin cheesemaker.

Joining the new Masters in the 2015 graduating class are veteran Masters who completed the program again to earn certification for additional cheese varieties. They are:

  • Ken Heiman, Nasonville Dairy, Marshfield, Wisconsin, now certified for cheddar and asiago, as well as feta and Monterey Jack.
  • Mike Matucheski, Sartori Company, Antigo, Wisconsin, now certified for fontina and romano, as well as parmesan and asiago.
  • Duane Petersen, Arla Foods USA Inc., Kaukauna, Wisconsin, now certified for havarti, as well as gouda and edam.
  • Steve Stettler, Decatur Dairy Inc., Brodhead, Wisconsin, now certified for cheddar, as well as brick, farmer’s cheese, havarti, muenster and specialty Swiss.

“It’s exciting to see the ranks of Wisconsin Master Cheesemakers continue to grow and for this unique program to have such a sustained, positive impact on cheesemaking in Wisconsin,” says James Robson, CEO of the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (WMMB). “Each year’s class takes the advanced training, expertise and insights they gain back to their plants and to the teams that they work with and mentor every day. The bar on product quality and innovation within those companies, large and small, just keeps rising.”

Established in 1994 through a joint partnership of the Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research, University of Wisconsin-Extension and Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (WMMB), the Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker program is the most formalized, advanced training program in the nation. Patterned after European programs, it is administered by the Center for Dairy Research and funded by Wisconsin dairy producers, through WMMB. Applicants must be active, licensed Wisconsin cheesemakers with at least 10 years of experience in a Quality Assured Plant. Cheesemakers can earn certification in up to two cheese varieties each time they enroll in the three-year program and must have been making those varieties as a licensed cheesemaker for a minimum of five years prior to entering the program. Once certified, they’re entitled to use the distinctive Master’s Mark® on their product labels and in other marketing materials.

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