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Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker Program Announces 2015 Graduates

The Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker® program, the nation’s only advanced training program of its kind for veteran cheesemakers, has graduated two new and four returning Master Cheesemakers. Wisconsin now has 55 active Masters working in 33 companies across the state.

The newest Master Cheesemakers, who were formally certified at a ceremony during the Wisconsin Cheese Industry Conference in Madison this week, are Adam Buholzer, of Klondike Cheese Company in Monroe, and Chris Roelli, of Roelli Cheese Haus in Shullsburg.

Buholzer is a fourth-generation cheesemaker and one of four Wisconsin Master Cheesemakers in the Buholzer family, including his father, Steve, and uncles, Ron and Dave Buholzer. Adam is now certified as a Master for feta and havarti.

Roelli is certified as a Master in cheddar, the variety on which his family’s original plant was founded. Since re-opening the business in 2006, he has emerged as an award-winning producer of artisanal Wisconsin originals, including Dunbarton Blue, Little Mountain and Red Rock. Like Buholzer, Roelli is a fourth-generation Wisconsin cheesemaker.

Joining the new Masters in the 2015 graduating class are veteran Masters who completed the program again to earn certification for additional cheese varieties. They are:

  • Ken Heiman, Nasonville Dairy, Marshfield, Wisconsin, now certified for cheddar and asiago, as well as feta and Monterey Jack.
  • Mike Matucheski, Sartori Company, Antigo, Wisconsin, now certified for fontina and romano, as well as parmesan and asiago.
  • Duane Petersen, Arla Foods USA Inc., Kaukauna, Wisconsin, now certified for havarti, as well as gouda and edam.
  • Steve Stettler, Decatur Dairy Inc., Brodhead, Wisconsin, now certified for cheddar, as well as brick, farmer’s cheese, havarti, muenster and specialty Swiss.

“It’s exciting to see the ranks of Wisconsin Master Cheesemakers continue to grow and for this unique program to have such a sustained, positive impact on cheesemaking in Wisconsin,” says James Robson, CEO of the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (WMMB). “Each year’s class takes the advanced training, expertise and insights they gain back to their plants and to the teams that they work with and mentor every day. The bar on product quality and innovation within those companies, large and small, just keeps rising.”

Established in 1994 through a joint partnership of the Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research, University of Wisconsin-Extension and Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (WMMB), the Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker program is the most formalized, advanced training program in the nation. Patterned after European programs, it is administered by the Center for Dairy Research and funded by Wisconsin dairy producers, through WMMB. Applicants must be active, licensed Wisconsin cheesemakers with at least 10 years of experience in a Quality Assured Plant. Cheesemakers can earn certification in up to two cheese varieties each time they enroll in the three-year program and must have been making those varieties as a licensed cheesemaker for a minimum of five years prior to entering the program. Once certified, they’re entitled to use the distinctive Master’s Mark® on their product labels and in other marketing materials.

Grand Champion of Canadian Cheese Grand Prix Announced


Fromagerie du Presbytère’s Laliberté is the new Grand Champion at the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix Gala of Champions. The cream-enriched soft cheese with a bloomy rind was determined best of all cheeses in 27 categories.

Sponsored and hosted every two years by Dairy Farmers of Canada, the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix celebrates the high quality, versatility and great taste of Canadian cheese made from Canadian milk. “From all the excellent cheeses the jury tasted, we found Laliberté to be the stand-out. This cheese truly distinguished itself in texture, taste and overall appearance. Its exquisite aromatic triple cream with its tender bloomy rind encases an unctuous well balanced flavour with hints of mushroom, pastures and root vegetables,” said Phil Bélanger, Canadian Cheese Grand Prix jury chairman. laliberte

Named after Alfred Laliberté, the famous sculptor born in St. Elizabeth de Warwick, QC, the farmstead cheese took a year and a half to develop and is made from 100 percent Canadian cow’s milk.The cheesemaker is no stranger to the Grand Prix, as their Louis d’Or was notably named Grand Champion of the contest in 2011.

The Grand Champion and 27 category winners were selected from a record-setting 268 cheese entries submitted by cheese makers from Prince Edward Island to British Columbia. The submissions were then narrowed down to 81 finalists by the jury in February.

With the expansion of entries, the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix has added nine new categories to the competition. Gouda was judged in three different age categories, as well as a category exclusively for smoked cheeses. Cheeses were judged on appearance, flavor, color, texture and body, and salt content.

Study: FDA Testing Finds Small Incidence of Antibiotic Residues in Dairy Milk

By Richard Thompson


An encouraging report by the FDA showed little evidence of antibiotic residuals in milk, with a system of dairy regulation that continues to provide safe and healthy milk to the market. Following up on concerns of elevated levels of antibiotics in dairy products, the study was done in part with farms that had a previous violation with antibiotic residue.

The report concluded that while the small number of positive drug residuals was encouraging, the FDA will continue to collaborate closely with state regulatory partners and the dairy industry to strengthen the residue testing program for Grade “A” milk. The FDA will also continue to educate dairy producers on best practices to avoid drug residue in both tissues and milk, keeping consumers safe and distributors compliant.

These results are a continuation of an ongoing trend for the past 20 years in reducing antibiotic residue in dairy products, noted Dr. Robert Collier, Professor of the School of Animal and Comparative Sciences at the University of Arizona, “The dairy industry is continually improving. Milk is tested at least five times before it gets to the store.” Collier, who was not part of the study, continued, “The dairy industry has a tried and true method to keep quality product that is safe and good for you.”

Targeting specific dairy farms with previous drug residue violations, the FDA wanted to study whether those farms with previous violations continued to have antibiotic residuals in their product. The FDA looked for evidence of drug residuals from 31 different antibiotics, and what they found was that over 99 percent from almost 2000 samples taken were free of any antibiotic residuals – it’s that tiny percentage remaining that raises concerns.

Using antibiotics in cattle is not unusual for the animal’s health and preventative care, but those medications are supposed to be metabolized before the animal can be considered a “lactating cow” that produces milk for sale. Recent studies have linked growing bacterial resistance to antibiotics with the infiltration of antibiotics into the human food chain.

Some consumers have responded to their concerns about what’s in their food by choosing organic alternatives. Don Grace, Dairy Buyer for Bashas’ family of stores, has seen the health and safety trend gaining momentum for some time, “Organic milk in dairy seems to have an increased interest with the customer. Sales are on an increase. Unfortunately suppliers can’t meet demand, and many times the product is on allocation,” he said. While fluid milk is the biggest seller in the category, especially due to its price, changing tastes are finding solutions in the growing selection of natural products. “Today’s customers know the benefits of milk, but are constantly being shown healthy alternates of organics like nut milk and soy milk,” Grace continued, “Milk is not the standard product anymore. People are finding they are lactose intolerant and allergic to certain items contained in fresh milk.”

But as Collier explained, just switching to organic might not be enough. “Even organic foods are not immune to pathogen questions. It’s a question of how it is handled and the safety preparations that are taken,” he said.

Milk is one of the most easily tested and regulated products, with safety tests conducted at every step of the distribution process from the bulk tanks at the dairy farms all the way to where it’s bottled, with random samples being tested before shipment. If any antibiotic residuals are found, the process allows for identification for possible residues along with the farms that they came from. Said Collier, “The bottom line is there are no antibiotic residuals in milk marketed.”

Despite the small number of dairy farms that may attempt to subvert the system in place, the vast majority of dairy cooperatives and distribution centers still adhere to the Grade “A” system of regulated production, following the federal, state and individual cooperative standards that are implemented from farms where the milk begins to the store or company where it will be bought or used.

The United Dairymen of Arizona, for instance, represent 85 percent of the dairy farms in Arizona, distributing 13 million pounds of milk a day, adhering to dairy standards that may exceed regulatory standards depending on the cooperative’s safety preferences. “Arizona has very progressive dairymen with animal wellness interests, following the new standard of FARM: ‘Farmers Assuring Responsible Management,’” said Mike Billotte, Vice President of Government Relations, United Dairymen of Arizona, “We follow the basic tenet of inspections of dairy, routine testing, residue testing and sediment testing. These routine testing agencies are enforced in every state.”


Bloomy Rinds and Sophisticated Aging Feature in Bohemian Creamery

By Micah Cheek

Bohemian Creamery, based in Sebasopol, California, is turning heads with unique goat, sheep, and cow cheeses crafted by the proud hands of Lisa Gottreich. Gottreich began selling her cheeses commercially six years ago, but she was honing her skills in cheesemaking for years before that in her home kitchen. The transition was natural for Gottreich, who said, “Really, the principles are very much the same, but the equipment is different.” The cheeses she produces are held in high regard, even served in Alice Waters’ restaurant, Chez Panisse. When asked how she managed to sell to such a prestigious pantry, Gottreich simply said “I marketed to them.” That confidence is well earned. Her depth of knowledge at every stage of the cheesemaking process commands respect and assures the buyer of a carefully crafted and unique eating experience.BohemianCreameryCheese_26c

Cheese lovers will notice some unusual offerings in Bohemian’s selection. One cheese, called Cowabunga, hides cajeta, or goat’s milk caramel, in its center. Surf and Turf has a fine vein of local seaweed running through the middle. In cold and wet months, the conditions are perfect to make The Bomb, a goat and sheep milk cheese conditioned to render the gooeyness and funk vaguely reminiscent of an Epoisse.

For a newcomer to artisan cheeses, Gottreich suggests one of her soft goat cheeses, called BoDacious. “It’s got a candidum rind, it’s very mild. People are used to the chevre style, and know that as goat cheese,” she said. For a different goat cheese experience, try the more firmly textured and nutty Capriago, which is brined and aged for up to 10 weeks. Her current favorite is the Romeo, aged a year and a half for complexity and crystallization.

While some cheesemakers gloss over the microbes required for cheese production, Gottreich makes sure the cultures she uses get their time in the spotlight. “Cheeses are defined by their rinds, of which there are basically three: bloom, washed and natural or traditional. But you couldn’t really talk about them without talking about mold.” Her water buffalo milk Agua Bufazola, for instance, is made with a milder strain than is normally used for blue cheeses. The Italian gorgonzola blue mold eases the punch of the six-week-old cheese without compromising flavor. With the milking season’s first offerings, Gottreich has made a batch of Boho Belle, a creamy semi soft cheese that requires six to eight weeks of aging. The end result will show off a delicate bloomy rind of geotrichum candidum.

Bohemian Creamery stresses the importance of not only picking the right cheese, but the right time to eat it. Her quality cheeses can, with proper care, give you a variety of flavor experiences over time. “People say, ‘This isn’t the same cheese I had before.’ Well maybe that cheese was a month old, and this one is a month and a half old,” she says. “Just like I’m not the same person I was when I was 10, many of my qualities have changed. Cheese is living and dying, just like we are. You can pick which qualities you like at a certain age.”

Guggisberg’s Swiss Wheel Named Champion Cheese

GuggisbergTeam Guggisberg Sugarcreek, of Guggisberg Cheese, Millersburg, Ohio, took top honors out of 1,892 entries from 28 states at the 2015 U.S. Championship Cheese Contest for their Swiss wheel. Out of a possible 100 points, the Swiss wheel scored 98.496 in the final round of judging, during which judges re-evaluated the top 16 cheeses at an evening charity gala to determine the overall champion.

First runner-up in the contest, with a score of 98.389, is a brick cheese made by John (Randy) Pitman of Mill Creek Cheese in Arena, Wisconsin. Second runner-up is a medium cheddar, made by the Kiel Production Team, in Land O Lakes, Kiel, Wisconsin which scored 98.337.

“Every medalist should be extremely proud of being recognized as the best of the best in the largest national dairy competition ever held,” said John Umhoefer, executive director of the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association, which hosts the biennial competition.

Wisconsin took home the most gold medals, with 56 of the total 90 categories judged. New York came in second among the states, with seven golds. California had six gold medals, Vermont had five, Idaho had four, and Oregon had three. Wisconsin, New York and California captured the most medals in the debut yogurt classes, each winning two medals.

The United States Championship Cheese Contest is the largest technical evaluation of cheese, butter and yogurt in the country and is rooted in more than 120 years of history, beginning when the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association held its first cheese contest in 1891. In recent years, the event has flourished, more than doubling in size since 2001. This year, more than 33,000 pounds of dairy products were entered into the contest.

For more information on the contest, as well as complete results for all 90 entry classes and contest photos, visit

Wisconsin Cheesemakers Win Big at U.S. Championship Cheese Contest

—Wisconsin dominated the 2015 U.S. Championship Cheese Contest in Milwaukee, sweeping more than a third of the categories judged.

Wisconsin cheesemakers claimed two of the three overall awards. John (Randy) Pitman, a Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker at Mill Creek Cheese Factory in Arena, Wisconsin, took First Runner-Up for his brick cheese. Founded in 1891, Mill Creek Cheese Factory is the oldest operating cheese plant in southwest Wisconsin’’s Iowa County. Second Runner-Up went to Land O ’Lakes, Inc. in Kiel, Wisconsin, for its medium cheddar.

This year’’s contest drew a record-breaking 1,892 entries from 28 states. Wisconsin captured 59 percent of awards: 160 of the total 270 given, far more than any other state. New York ranked second in total awards with 20, followed by Vermont with 18 and California with 16.

Fifty-six Wisconsin companies took one or more awards with 11 garnering five or more. They are: Agropur inc.; BelGioioso Cheese, Inc.; Carr Valley Cheese Co., Inc.; Edelweiss Creamery; Hidden Springs Creamery; Holland’s Family Cheese, LLC; Klondike Cheese Co.; Lactalis Deli, Inc.; Mill Creek Cheese Factory; Montchevré-Betin Inc.; and Sartori Company.

For a complete rundown on Wisconsin’’s awards, visit For more information about Wisconsin cheese, visit

Saputo Launches Joan of Arc Goat Cheese Medallions

Saputo Specialty Cheese is excited to announce the launch of a new item!

JOA-5oz-Goat-Medallion-BagJoan of Arc® Goat Cheese Medallions are the newest extension to the brand’s line of traditional and flavored goat cheeses. The single-serve medallions are conveniently packaged as five 1-ounce individual portions in a single 5-ounce bag.

Joan of Arc goat cheeses are made with the freshest and highest quality goat milk collected from independent family farms and feature a mild and tangy flavor with a noticeably fresh aftertaste. The new goat cheese medallions provide a portion-controlled single serving of fresh and creamy chèvre perfect for on-the-go lunches and snacks. Serve with crackers, dried fruit and nuts for a filling meal or pair with crisp white wines for a well-rounded treat.

Retailers interested in placing orders for the new item can contact a Saputo Specialty Cheese sales representative by e-mail at or by phone at 1.800.782.0741.


Stonyfield Launches Full Fat Organic Yogurt

Stonyfield is launching its latest innovation to the yogurt aisle with an exclamation. Oh My Yog! is made with organic whole milk and fruit, and comes in a completely unique three-layer format – fruit on the bottom, honey-infused yogurt in the middle and a decadent layer of cream on top – for an everyday indulgence made better because it’s organic.

“Whole milk is part of the growing food trend of healthy fat making a comeback. Not only is it incredibly delicious – you really can’t beat a layer of cream on top of your yogurt – it’s also recognized as a more wholesome kind of real food,” shared Ben Angeloni, Vice President of Marketing for Stonyfield. “We have fans ask us for full fat yogurt every single day, and we’re excited to deliver something exceptional with Oh My Yog!”

Oh My Yog!, now available in select retailers nationwide, is easy to recognize in the yogurt aisle thanks to its colorfully striped Y&R Spain-designed packaging that was inspired by the three layers inside. “Everything about Oh My Yog! – from its name to its distinctive, striped packaging – reflects the experience you have when you’re eating it. It’s all about enjoying beautiful layers of a really delicious food,” said Angeloni.

Oh My Yog! comes in six decadent 6-oz varieties for the suggested retail price of $1.59: Madagascar Vanilla Bean, Wild Quebec Blueberry, Pacific Coast Strawberry, Gingered Pear, Apple Cinnamon, and Orange Cranberry.

New Finlandia Imported Butter: Delicious, All-Natural, Non-GMO Butter from Internationally Renowned Cheesemaker

Finlandia, the internationally renowned cheesemaker and a highly regarded brand in America, introduces Finlandia Imported Butter.

This Valentine’s day, Finlandia invites consumers to share their love with that special person by sharing their favorite breakfast; whipping up a savory dinner for two or cooking up some romantic, sweet desserts – all using Finlandia Imported Butter. This eclectic natural butter is perfect for breakfast, to butter a favorite muffin or croissant with its sweet, rich taste. Finlandia Imported Butter is also the go-to choice at dinnertime, to infuse a meal with the full butter experience, followed up by decadent, chocolate delights, also baked with Finlandia Imported Butter.

Finlandia Imported Butter is crafted from pure, fresh milk, and produced on family-owned farms in Finland. It’s perfect for the American natural palate and is made with non-GMO ingredients according to EU standards, with no rBST hormones. Finlandia Imported Butter is made from cows that graze heartily during the warm seasons, and are fed non-GMO feed.

Finlandia Imported Butter also offers a healthy addition to one’s diet. The American Heart Association (AMA) now recommends butter in moderation, in Americans’ diets. The AMA reports that consumers can healthfully obtain up to 7 percent of their daily calories with this healthy fat. Not all butters are alike. Finlandia Imported Butter is the all-natural choice for chefs and home cooks alike.

With butter regaining in popularity, even millennials are loving it. The newest coffee craze, BulletProof coffee, the butter-containing beverage, is steaming up cafes from coast to coast. The secret to making this hot cup of java is butter - but not just any butter. Finlandia(R) Imported Butter, the perfect match for BulletProof coffee: natural, rich, non-GMO butter added to coffee for a satisfying dose of morning energy. This new coffee trend is a hit, offering caffeine, filling calories and offering a healthy fat to fuel one’s busy morning.

Crafted with pure, wholesome milk, rich and creamy Finlandia Imported Butter brings butter from family-owned farms to the American table.

For more information, visit

Tickets Available Now for California’s Artisan Cheese Festival

The 9th Annual California’s Artisan Cheese Festival has announced this year’s roster of experts leading seminars and workshops on Saturday, March 21, 2015. The weekend-long festival takes place March 20-22 and brings together artisan cheesemakers, chefs, brewers, sommeliers, winemakers and passionate guests for three days of touring, tasting and learning about artisan cheese.

Bringing attendees face-to-face with the experts who work with and create some of America’s best artisan cheeses, the Saturday seminars and workshops tend to sell out early every year. Some of the experts that will be leading seminars this March are:

  • Janet Fletcher, author and co-author of more than 20 books on food, cheese and wine, including her newsletter Planet Cheese, is leading two seminars: “Cheese & Cider Happily Ever After” and “Hops vs. Malt: A Smackdown with Cheese.” She will be co-leading the Cheese & Cider seminar with Ellen Cavelli, co-owner of Tilted Shed Ciderworks and next-generation leader in the American Cider Revival. Fletcher and Cavelli will lead guests through a range of traditional cider styles (French, West Country, Basque and single-varietal), as well as wholly unique styles as interpreted by American producers, while helping attendees discover the cheeses that fine cider loves best. In Hops vs. Malt, Fletcher will teach attendees the do’s and dont’s of pairing cheese with hoppy ales vs. malt-focused brews.
  • Award-winning author and lecturer Laura Werlin is leading the “Cheese & Chocolate – World’s Two Best Foods on One Plate, One Palate” seminar as well as “California’s Sheep’s Milk Cheeses (and Wine).” An expert in American artisan cheeses, Werlin received the prestigious James Beard award for her book “The All American Cheese and Wine Book,” which was the first of its kind to focus entirely on cheese and wine pairing. She also received a prestigious James Beard Award nomination for her book, “Laura Werlin’s Cheese Essentials.” In the Cheese & Chocolate seminar, Werlin will cover the basics in tasting cheese and chocolate side by side, and in her Sheep’s Milk seminar, she will shed light on this rarely used milk and the newcomers around California who specialize in it.
  • The world’s first Honey Flavor Wheel was recently developed by Amina Harris, director of the Honey and Pollination Center at the Robert Mondavi Institute of Wine and Food Science at UC Davis. Harris will be employing her honey wheel and joining forces with Lynne DevereauxDirector of Marketing and Public Relations for Laura Chenel’s Chevre and Marin French Cheese Company, in leading a seminar entitled “What A Perfect Pair: Honey & Cheese.” Cheese and honey are inseparable partners on cheese plates and in recipes. This session goes behind the hive to show how hard the honeybees work to produce honey and how vital their work as pollinators is to the food shed. With a passion for quality and respect for authenticity, Harris and Devereaux are dedicated to celebrating honey and cheese in Sonoma County. Each attendee will also receive a Honey Flavor Wheel to take home.
  • Stephanie Skinner and Thalassa (Lassa) Skinner, co-owners of Culture:  The Word on Cheese magazine, are leading a seminar entitled “Pair if you Dare.” In this innovative seminar, guests will go beyond the usual cheese accompaniments with a broad selection of cheese styles alongside out-of-the-ordinary pairings – including pickled vegetables, smoked shellfish, chocolate, teas, sour beer, and tropical fruits. Stephanie and Lassa will discuss what makes a good pairing and why, as well as different tastes and textures, to help attendees find comfort in contrasts as well as in complements.


  • Soyoung Scanlan, the owner and cheesemaker at Andante Dairy, is leading a seminar entitled “All About the Milk: Tasting & Working with Different Cheeses.” Before becoming a cheesemaker, Scanlan worked as a biochemist and a dairy scientist, but has found her passion in making cheese. In this seminar, Scanlan will discuss how to understand how each milk expresses itself in the context of cheese and how cheese reveals the essence of the terroirs in which the milk and the cheese are produced. Attendees of this seminar will taste and learn about cheeses from cows, goats, buffalo, and sheep.
  • Peggy Smith and Sue Conley, the co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, will be leading an informative educational afternoon seminar and tasting entitled “Four Ingredients to the Nth Power.”This seminar is for those who want to take the next step in learning about the technical aspects of the four basic ingredients of cheese, and what each element contributes to the final product as well as how the elements interact to make different cheeses. This class will take place at the new Cowgirl Creamery warehouse in Petaluma, which is just a short walk away from the Sheraton.

Sacha Laurin, the assistant cheesemaker at Winters Cheese Company, is leading a unique cheesemaking seminar entitled “Feta and Friends.” The origins of feta go back as far as the late Roman Empire and sometimes the recipe can seem similarly Byzantine. Fortunately, Laurin has adapted the feta-making process for the home cheesemaker, and in this class attendees will make their own batch, then dress up their cheese with olive oil, tapenades, fresh and dried herbs, and other goodies.

Louella Hill, also known as the San Francisco Milk Maid, is leading a cheesemaking seminar entitled “Mozzarella Making,”as well as a hands-on educational seminar entitled “Three Milks, One Recipe, Many Tastes.”

  • The cheesemaking seminar focuses on teaching budding cheesemakers to make a perfect mozzarella, as well as learning mozzarella stretching, rolling, braiding, twisting, and stuffing. The educational seminar is a hands-on learning experience that teaches attendees the difference between goat’s, cow’s and sheep’s milks by tasting, touching and smelling every step of the process from the starting liquid to a finished wheel. This class gives non-cooks (and less confident foodies) a way to do something hands-on while building confidence around the language used to describe different cheeses.

For those home cheesemakers who are ready to move on from mozzarella and ricotta, cheesemaker and educator Stephanie Soleil is leading a seminar entitled “Cheesemaking 201: Pressed Cheese – Romano.” This intermediate cheesemaking class teaches home cheesemakers how to press cheese and properly age cheese in their own refrigerators, and every attendee will go home with their own round to continue aging for weeks or months.

  • For those who enjoy a little friendly competition between cheesemakers, then “Bite of California – Cheesemaker Battle for the Best Bite” is the seminar to attend. In order to illustrate the versatility of cheese and some of the incredible food produced in California, cheesemakers including Cypress Grove Chevre and Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery will each prepare a savory and sweet bite showcasing their cheese. In a friendly clash of California’s booming specialty food world, the attendees will sample these bites and vote for their favorite “Bite of California” while learning about food pairing.

All seminars, except the Cowgirls’ afternoon seminar, will take place at the festival’s host hotel, Sheraton Sonoma County–Petaluma (745 Baywood Drive, Petaluma, CA 94954). Seminar times are 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 21. The ticket price for the seminars and workshops includes a catered lunch by Petaluma Market from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $95 per person for the cheesemaking seminars and $65-$75 per person for all other seminars. Several participating authors will also be signing and selling their books between 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. in the main lobby of the Sheraton Sonoma County. Tickets for all events can be purchased at

Those interested can also follow updates by “liking” the Artisan Cheese Festival on Facebookand following the event on Twitter. All events are priced separately and the Sheraton Sonoma County – Petaluma is offering special discounted rates on rooms for festival-goers.

Generous sponsors of the Artisan Cheese Festival include All American Printing, American AgCredit, Beehive Cheese Company, California Milk Advisory Board, Central Coast Creamery, Clover Stornetta Farms, Cowgirl Creamery, Culture magazine, Cypress Grove Chevre, Donald & Maureen Green Foundation, Edible Marin and Wine CountryEdible East Bay, Exchange Bank, Ellipses Public Relations, Fiscalini Cheese Co., John Boos, Lagunitas Brewing Company, Laura Chenel Chevre, Marin French Cheese Company, Nicasio Valley Cheese Company, Nugget Markets Inc., Oliver’s Markets, Orland Farmstead Creamery, Pennyroyal Farm & Creamery, Petaluma Creamery, Petaluma Market, Petaluma Post, Pisenti & Brinker LLP, Pt. Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company, Redwood Hill Farm, Relish Culinary Adventures, Redwood Hill Farm Rustic Bakery, Sierra Nevada Cheese Company, Sheraton Sonoma County, Simple & Crisp, The Cheese School of San Francisco, Valley Ford Cheese Company, and Willapa Hills Cheese.

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