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Karoun Dairies, Inc. Creates New Category in the Cream Cheese Section with Launch of Blue Isle Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads

Karoun Dairies is promising that the new Blue Isle’s Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads will provide a healthy and delicious choice for consumers who love their cream cheese but would prefer  a lower-fat and lower-calorie option. America has an obsession with cream cheese. From countless recipes shared on Pinterest to the popular Twitter #foodporn hashtag commonly linked to #creamcheese, there is no doubt that Americans love their schmear. Grocery sales reflect these sentiments. A 2009-2011 Mintel study of US retail sales shows that cream cheese spread is the fastest-growing segment with 8.5 percent growth.

However, America’s growing waistline has driven consumers to choose healthier alternatives to comfort food favorites, which has something to do with why The Wall Street Journal coined “permissible indulgence” as the big food industry buzzword for 2014. Popular examples of this phenomenon include gluten-free, Greek yogurt, kale chips, and quinoa cookies.

BlueIsleKeeping up with the demand and offering a healthy solution for cream cheese lovers with the added benefit of probiotics, Blue Isle’s Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads is the latest innovation to hit the dairy aisle this summer. Samples will be available at booth #566 during the Summer Fancy Food Show in New York City.

“We use hand-crafted traditional methods of blending, aging, and fermenting all of our probiotic rich yogurt spreads,” states Rostom Baghdassarian, COO for Karoun Dairies. “This year, we are delighted to introduce Blue Isle Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads, as we’ve seen a major demand for healthier, Mediterranean-style spreads. Blue Isle is a fresh, tasty, and health conscious alternative to traditional cream cheeses.”

Blue Isle’s Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads offer nutritional balance and taste.  Today’s cream cheese category is limited in both selection and brands and the goal of Blue Isle’s Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads is to raise the bar in the retail cream cheese category with superior flavors, functionality and nutrition.

Blue Isle Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads are made from the healthy goodness of yogurt, including live cultures, probiotics, and calcium but with no added sugar. With only 60 calories and 6g of fat per 2 tbsp serving, Blue Isle has nearly 40 percent fewer calories and total fat than the leading cream cheese. All natural and kosher have both been reported as important factors in consumers’ purchase choices, and Blue Isle is both natural and OU Kosher certified.

While the health benefits of Blue Isle are clear, the delicious flavor and mouth-watering texture are the real factors for this category innovation. Blue Isle is the over-achieving cousin to traditional cream cheese. Creamy, rich, and comforting, Blue Isle is a product that needs to be experienced. The spreads can be used as an alternative to cream cheese spread, a dip, in cooking, or as an exotic “good for you” treat.

Blue Isle is available in the following flavors:

  • Original
  • Honey
  • Blueberry
  • French Onion
  • Spicy Vegetable

Blue Isle will be available soon in the following US stores: Harmon’s, Mollie Stone’s, Central Market, Fiesta Mart, The Fresh Market, New Seasons, H-E-B, Lucky, Fred Meyer, QFC, at natural food stores and better supermarkets nationwide. Suggested retail price is $3.29 for an 8-ounce tub.

Blue Isle is distributed by Karoun Dairies, Inc., a second-generation family business with multiple awards for excellence in the cheese and dairy industry. Accolades include World Cheese Awards, World Championship Cheese medals, U.S. Championships, American Cheese Society medals, and California State Fair awards to name a few.  Karoun produces some of California’s finest specialty cheeses; using century-old and handmade methods. All 130+ SKUs are made from ultra-premium ingredients, including premium milk from cows that are free of artificial hormones, BGH/rBST, and are Real California Milk certified.

Visit booth #566 at the Summer Fancy Food Show June 29 ­-July 1 at the Jacob Javits Center, where Karoun Dairies will showcase many delectable cheeses and yogurts as well as offer samples of Blue Isle’s brand new smooth and creamy Mediterranean Yogurt Spreads.

Sartori Released Limited Edition Goat Cheese

Sartori goatSartori Cheese will be releasing its Limited Edition Extra-Aged Goat cheese for June and July. Hand-crafted in small batches, this special cheese is only released twice a year and will be sold to specialty cheese shops throughout the U.S.

Jarlsberg Cheese Now Packaged for Convenient Snacking

 

Jarlsberg® can now be enjoyed anytime, anywhere. Jarlsberg Minis elevate grab-and-go snacking to a gourmet level with their premium quality and mild, mellow and nutty flavor.

Jarlsberg_Minis_Silo-002v1_4CJarlsberg Minis come packaged in eye-catching 100g bags containing five 20g Minis, for easy deli merchandising. Each Mini has been dipped in wax and wrapped in cellophane – replicating the popular Jarlsberg wheel.

Jarlsberg Minis perfectly suit the needs of today’s busy consumer with hectic schedules who snack more frequently but want healthier options. All natural and just 70 calories per piece, Jarlsberg Minis are a good source of calcium and protein.

The product will have full in-store merchandising support plus an ongoing multi-faceted marketing program. Visit www.jarlsbergusa.com to learn more.

 

10 Companies Working to Redefine Frozen Desserts for the 21st Century

 

Few desserts are as timeless and quintessentially American as the frosty ice cream cone. However, with specialty food companies today crafting everything from riesling and poached pear sorbet to doppelbock bacon ale ice cream to ice pops infused with kiwi, avocado and spinach puree, it is clear that the world of frozen desserts has gone positively gourmet. Check out these companies putting their unique spins on American classics.

1. Chloe’s Soft Serve Fruit Pops. Forget your traditional frozen fruit bar. Chloe’s Soft Serve Fruit Pops are made with only three simple ingredients: fruit, water and a touch of organic cane sugar. They are all-natural, free of dairy, fat and gluten, non-GMO and have only 13-15 grams of sugar per serving. At just 60 calories, Chloe’s Pops are guilt-free fun on a stick. 

2. Denali Flavors. Michigan-based Denali Flavors, Inc. is one of the leading inventors and marketers of specialty flavors for the ice cream industry, including its signature flavor: Moose Tracks®. Today, the product line consists of more than 30 flavors, including Caramel Caribou® (toffee ice cream with caramel) and Bear Claw® (dark chocolate with cashews). 

3. Graeter’s. Artisan ice cream company Graeter’s is the only commercial enterprise to make all of its ice creams using a traditional small batch French pot process. The result is an irresistible creaminess. The company’s attention to detail even translates to the packaging process where nearly 20,000 pints are carefully packed by hand each day. 

4. Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams. The team at sofi Award-winning Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams has truly elevated ice cream to an art form. The company’s product line incorporates a slew of unique ingredients, including rosemary, whiskey, lavender, goat cheese, sweet potatoes, cedarwood, cardamom and more. Jeni’s also offers signature sauces, ice cream sandwiches and gravels (crunch condiments). 

5. Ruby Rocket’s. Ruby Rocket’s fruit and vegetable ice pops are a refreshing, all-natural snack. These healthy pops are gluten-free, dairy-free, and non-GMO. With less than 35 calories and 2 grams of sugar per pop, these treats are a healthier and delicious way to satisfy any summertime sweet tooth. Ruby Rocket’s are available in three delicious flavors. 

6. Salt & Straw. Based in Portland, Ore., the team at Salt & Straw pride themselves on supporting their local community and celebrating Oregon in their flavors and ingredients. The company’s unique product line includes one-of-a-kind flavors such as Lumberjack Stack (blueberry pancakes with maple syrup), honey balsamic strawberry with cracked black pepper and Oregon pear with blue cheese. 

7. Talenti Gelato & Sorbetto. Talenti® recently announced the launch of three delicious new gelato flavors that reinvent classic American desserts: caramel apple pie, fudge brownie and raspberries and cream. Talenti’s newest additions to its growing line of gelatos remind us that America’s favorite sweet treats are just as good enjoyed as delicious frozen desserts.

8. TEA•RRIFIC! ICE CREAM. The goal of TEA•RRIFIC! ICE CREAM is to craft the finest all-natural tea-infused ice creams using only the best ingredients sourced locally and from around the globe. The company keeps it simple, while delivering a distinctly delicious ice cream experience that is flavorful, creamy, finishes clean off the palate and leaves you wanting more. 

9. Velvet Ice Cream. Family-owned and operated, Velvet produces more than five million gallons of ice cream every year from its Ohio headquarters. The company celebrates its 100th anniversary on May 1. Velvet honors old fashioned tradition with its classic ice cream products and flavors, such as Buckeye Classic, peach cobbler and Italian spumoni. 

10. Yasso Greek Frozen Yogurt. Made with only natural ingredients, Yasso Greek Frozen Yogurt Bars feature real Greek yogurt, rBST-free milk and natural sweeteners, Yasso is a great low-calorie frozen treat filled with protein and containing little to no fat. Yasso currently offers bars in 11 delicious flavors, and products can be found at major grocery and club stores nationwide.

 

Flash-Frozen Ice Creams Emerge on the Scene as Popularity of Frozen Desserts Continues to Explode Nationwide

By Zach Calvello

Frozen desserts experienced a 28.2 percent increase in sales over the past two years, making this the third-highest category for growth within the larger specialty foods industry. This is according to The State of The Specialty Food Industry, an annual report from the Specialty Food Association. Louise Kramer, Public Relations Director for the Specialty Food Association, attributes this rise in the popularity of frozen desserts to the amount of innovation being displayed by those involved in creating new frozen desserts. “There are many new and interesting products being released in the category of frozen desserts, such as non-dairy desserts, vegetable pops, soy-based products and indulgent desserts,” said Kramer.

SubZero1-DFDJerry Hancock, founder and CEO of Sub Zero, and Scot Rubin, co-founder of Nitropod, not only share in the benefits of this growth within the larger frozen foods industry, but the pair are also both somewhat responsible for the innovative thinking that is stimulating the trend. This is because both Sub Zero and Nitropod make ice cream using a unique, specialized process that involves freezing ice cream with liquid nitrogen. Along with a small, select group of ice cream vanguards, including Iowa-based Blue Sky Creamery, Washington-based Flash Freeze Dreamery, California-based Smitten Ice Cream, Chicago-based iCream Café and a few others, Sub Zero and Nitropod have been working to transform the world of ice cream as we know it.

The process of flash freezing ice cream with liquid nitrogen results in a truly unique product. With a temperature of minus 321 degrees Fahrenheit, liquid nitrogen freezes ice cream mix in less than 15 seconds. Since this flash freezing process happens so quickly, milk molecules stay very small, and ice crystals do not have time to form. This results in the smoothest and creamiest ice cream possible. In addition, the process also preserves more of the natural nutrients in the finished product.

Neither Sub Zero nor Nitropod were the first to use liquid nitrogen to flash freeze ice cream. This honor belongs to culinary pioneer Theodore Gray. “Theodore Gray’s article made the possibilities known. However, our uniqueness lies in our process,” says Hancock. Instead of combining liquid nitrogen and ice cream mix in intervals, Sub Zero combines everything at the same time. This creates what Hancock calls “the lake effect,” allowing Sub Zero to cut each layer of ice cream, one by one, as it freezes.

Nitropod’s Rubin praises flash frozen ice cream for its particularly smooth and creamy consistency. He delivers liquid nitrogen ice cream to his loyal Los Angeles-based customer base in a specialized ice cream truck. Rubin believes liquid nitrogen is an important element that helps him to create a truly premium product, although he argues that it takes a deft touch to ultimately master the frozen dessert. “Liquid Nitrogen is great,” he says. “It makes for smoother and creamier ice cream. But it can’t be the only factor in making great ice cream.” Rubin counts Nitropod’s chef-inspired flavors and ingredients sourced from local artisans as two additional factors compelling his company’s success.

One of the benefits of freezing ice cream on the spot is that each customer has the option of including or excluding every element that makes up the final product. This sort of customization allows ice cream producers to cater individually to each customer’s dietary needs. “It starts with the milk, where we have low-fat, almond and non-dairy choices,” says Hancock. The company even lets customers bring in their own ingredients to add to the mix, making for a fun and individualized ice cream experience.

Rubin looks forward to eventually bringing liquid nitrogen-frozen ice cream to retailers. “Retailing is phase two of [Nitropod’s] plan,” he says. The ice cream entrepreneur thinks he will eventually be able do this without changing his company’s current flash freezing process. “There are those that love to watch the ice cream being made, and then there are those who just love it for the taste,” he says. “Sometimes there is a substantial wait time at Nitropod, so we want to be able to provide for people that just don’t have time for that.”

Still, despite how decadent the final product is, it is the science behind flash frozen ice cream’s production that is often the first thing to draw consumers to sample the product. And it is the science that ultimately inspires the team at Sub Zero to innovate the frozen desserts industry. “Science is the driving force behind our product,” says Hancock.

 Click here for more companies who are blazing new trails in frozen desserts.

MouCo’s Ashley Turns Heads in Madison

MouCo’s Ashley is at it again! On March 20, Fort Collins, Colo’s favorite ash-covered cheese earned a silver medal at the 30th Biennial World Championship Cheese Contest in Madison, Wis. Previously, the Ashley snagged a blue ribbon in the soft-ripened category at the American Cheese Society Conference both in August 2012 and August 2013.

MouCo Cheese Company is owned and operated by Birgit Halbreiter and Robert Poland in Fort Collins. The pair incorporated their company in November of 1999. Back then, their specialty was Camembert—a soft, buttery cheese with a mild nutty flavor. In the last several years, MouCo has introduced four additional varieties of cheese, including the award-winning Ashley in July of 2012. MouCo regulars can’t get enough of this creamy, mildly sweet cheese with its distinctive vegetable ash rind. Ashley’s sweet undertones are best complemented with a salad of bitter greens, a dollop of pepper jelly, or a glass of dry red wine.

Ashley starts the way all MouCo cheeses start: with fresh, local cow’s milk. The cheese curd is gently moved into forms that give the cheese its shape and size. Before the two-week aging process, a mixture of culture and edible vegetable ash is applied to the cheese to aid the development of Ashley’s special rind characteristics. The vegetable ash rind acts like a natural preservative, keeping the cheese extra creamy and mildly sweet. When it’s ready, this natural-rind cheese will be an ashy color with a slight white finish.

The World Championship Cheese Contest was founded in 1957 and is hosted by the Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association. This year, the event drew over 2,000 entries from 22 different countries; the entries were tasted and scored by 50 judges from all around the world. Ashley earned a silver medal in the open soft-ripened category, but she wasn’t the only one turning heads: MouCo’s ColoRouge, and PepBert both placed in the top ten in their respective categories at this year’s contest.

New Museum to Showcase Manchego Cheese

The former Malpica residence, a 19th century mansion in Manzanares (Ciudad Real, Spain) is to house the world’s first museum dedicated exclusively to one of Spain’s gastronomic treasures: Manchego cheese. According to Ignacio Barco, President of the Manchego Cheese Designation of Origin, and the latest generation in a long dynasty of master cheese-makers, “This initiative started out with the aim of safeguarding the tremendous gastronomic and cultural heritage that this cheese represents. We want to make sure that we never lose the expertise and tradition that make Manchego cheese such a unique and inimitable product. The best way of preserving this heritage is to spread the word so consumers know how to appreciate the real thing and reject any imitations.”

His cheese factory, which was founded at the same time as the Regulating Council in 1840, is one of the leading producers of artisan Manchego cheese and even produces its own milk. It shares this reverence for tradition with all the other cheese factories under the umbrella of the Designation of Origin.

With a production output of over 26 million pounds of cheese per year and growth of 20 percent in the last five, the devotion the D.O. cheese-makers feel for the genuine values of their tradition is quite impressive.

According to Barco, “As an artisan cheese-maker, I’m often saddened by the public’s general ignorance about our product.” This lack of information is even more evident among international consumers. “The Americans, who are real Manchego cheese lovers, are less familiar than Europeans with the Designation of Origin system. For this reason, companies that do not belong to the DO take advantage of the reputation of Manchego cheese to introduce imitations to the U.S. market which have absolutely nothing to do with the genuine article.”

But how do you differentiate an authentic Manchego cheese from a fake? “It’s very simple,” says Barco. “Every cheese certified by the Regulating Council of the DO Manchego Cheese has a double label. Firstly there’s the identifying label on the outside of the cheese, and secondly, there’s an exclusive serial number engraved in the cheese itself; these guarantee that each piece is unique.”

A characteristic flavor that visitors to the world’s first museum devoted exclusively to Manchego cheese will be able to appreciate, not only within the walls of the former Malpica mansion itself but also outside them, in the local taverns and restaurants. Manchego cheese never ceases to delight thanks to its countless culinary facets and uses.

“As the new generation of Manchego cheese-makers, we have the obligation to continue communicating and expressing who we are, what we do, the tradition we represent and the flavor of our cheeses, all of which have given us national and international renown. We need to be out there making sure that our legacy will endure,” Barco says.

Castello New York Pop-up Store Celebrates the Art of Creatively Crafted Cheese

Castello® cheese, maker of creatively crafted cheese available at grocery and fine food stores nationwide, will celebrate the art of cheese with its New York City Pop-up Store, open today through July 6 at 462 West Broadway in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood.

Over the next nine weeks, Castello will offer visitors a selection of premium cheeses; interactive tastings; elegant, made-to-order Premium Cheese Layer Cakes for celebrations; mini seminars about entertaining with cheese; experiential evenings centered around cheese; and in-store sculpting demonstrations transforming premium cheese into works of art depicting New York City landmarks. Plus, cheese lovers have the opportunity to win access to an exclusive Castello Pop-up Store grand opening party on May 14 with Chef Michael Symon, James Beard Foundation award-winning chef, restaurateur, television personality and author.

“For more than 120 years, Castello has been the source of the finest creatively crafted cheeses, bringing innovation and tradition to the art of cheese making,” said Susan Burris, Castello Brand Manager. “We pride ourselves in offering traditional regional recipes and our own uniquely crafted cheeses, always made with natural ingredients. This attention to detail comes to life in our Castello New York Pop-up Store, where food lovers can experience the true art of cheese, whether it’s for personal enjoyment, entertaining or life’s many celebrations.”

Win your way to an exclusive epicurean evening
Twenty-five food lovers and one guest will win access to a private party on May 14 to celebrate the store’s grand opening with cheese and wine. Winners will have the chance to meet Symon and will witness the unveiling of a specially commissioned sculpture of the New York City skyline, carved by renowned food artist Jim Victor entirely out of Castello Alps Selection Hirten cheese.

Cheese lovers age 21 and older can enter to win by sharing a photo that shows cheese is a work of art using the hashtag #CastelloArt by May 11 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. Winners will be drawn at random and notified on May 12. Full legal rules are available at facebook.com/castellousa.

Ongoing experiences for cheese lovers
From May 2 through July 6, the public is invited to visit the store, which will offer a wide selection of Castello cheeses for sale, including many available only for a limited time in the United States. In addition, store visitors are invited to participate in the following opportunities and activities:

  • Premium Cheese Layer Cakes – Store visitors can see examples of beautiful multilayered Castello Premium Cheese Layer Cakes made from edible cheese wheels and available for order and pickup at the store. The creatively crafted cakes, which resemble elegant, tiered wedding cakes but are made of cheese, feature two, three and four layers of different cheese varieties, embellished with edible flowers, fruits, nuts and more. The cakes will be available May 9 through July 6.
  • The Castello Cheesemonger Challenge – Store visitors are invited to participate in the Cheesemonger Challenge at the store May 9 through July 6 to test their knowledge of various types of cheese. Wearing a blindfold, they will sample three different Castello cheese varieties and guess which is which, earning an official “Cheesemonger Challenge” reward certificateCastello will also host a social “Cheesemonger Challenge” every Tuesday on its Facebook, Twitter and Instagram channels. Fans will be asked to suggest a food and wine pairing for various Castello cheeses for the chance to earn a special reward.
  • Cheese Sculptures – Castello has commissioned renowned food artist Jim Victor to create three hand-carved sculptures entirely out of Castello Alps Selection Hirten cheese. Victor will transform the cheese into works of art, including sculptures of the famous New York skyline, Times Square and the Brooklyn Bridge. The first sculpture will be unveiled on May 14, with additional sculptures carved live, in-store June 4-6 and June 18-20.
  • Free Cheese Class: Creating the Perfect Cheeseboard – This mini-seminar will cover the art of creating the perfect cheeseboard using Castello cheese and various food and serving items available for purchase in the shop. Attendees will also learn how to select the right accompaniment to enhance the flavor of each kind of cheese. The class will be offered on various dates over the next several weeks.
  • Free Cheese Class: Entertaining with Cheese – This mini-seminar will cover the art of entertaining with cheese. Attendees will learn which knives to use, how to cut and serve Castello cheese, when to take cheeses out of the refrigerator, how to store them after a party and more. The class will be offered on various dates over the next several weeks.
  • Create Your Own Premium Cheese Layer Cake – Food lovers can enjoy an experiential evening learning how to make their own creatively crafted Premium Cheese Layer Cake featuring Castello cheese. Guests will learn about different styles of Castello cheese and their ideal food pairings. Then, they’ll select their favorite cheeses to create an epicurean layered cheese “cake” featuring edible decor. The class is offered for a fee on various dates and times over the next several weeks.

A store that elevates cheese making to an art: Food lovers who visit the Castello New York Pop-up Store will find a variety of items for purchase that celebrate the art of cheese. Varieties include Castello extraordinarily tangy and distinctive Danish Blue cheeses; buttery, nutty and irresistible Havarti cheeses including Creamy, Aged, Light and gourmet flavors; exceptional Alps Selection cheeses crafted in the Alpine tradition; and super-premium Unika collection handcrafted, uniquely styled artisan cheeses. Many items to elevate the enjoyment of cheese are also offered, including flatbreads, fruit pastes, fig spreads, chutneys, jams and jellies, as well as cheese preparation and serving utensils.

To learn more about Castello cheese, find delicious recipes and more, visit castellocheese.com.

Nancy’s Announces Non-GMO Project Verification

The family owned and operated Springfield Creamery announced today that its legacy brand of Nancy’s Organic Dairy products is now Non-GMO Project verified through the Non-GMO Project – making the Nancy’s brand one of the few Non-GMO Project verified organic yogurts with national distribution. Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Kefir and Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Cultured Cottage Cheese are the first Non-GMO Project verified kefir and cottage cheese currently on the market.

“Folks continue to be concerned about the possibility of GMOs in their foods and we share this concern, which is why we have taken the steps to verify that our cultured organic dairy products do not contain GMO ingredients. The Non-GMO Project verification gives us that extra level of transparency that our customers are looking for,” says Co-owner Sheryl Kesey Thompson, of the family-owned and operated Springfield Creamery. “Getting verified is a very thorough process, so we are pleased to be able to share this news with our customers.”
Verification by the Non-GMO Project is a rigorous program that includes traceability, segregation, and testing at critical control points. Securing Verified status confirms Nancy’s Organic Dairy products are produced in compliance with the Non-GMO Project Standard, meaning that ongoing testing of all GMO risk ingredients, facility inspections and annual audits take place to ensure that the company is meeting standards for GMO avoidance.
The Non-GMO Project now verifies that the following Nancy’s products are Non-GMO Project Verified:
  • Nancy’s Organic Whole Milk Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Plain Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Blackberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Blueberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Raspberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Strawberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Whole Milk Probiotic Plain Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Cultured Cottage Cheese
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Cultured Cottage Cheese Fruit on Top-Strawberry
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Plain Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Blackberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Blueberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Peach Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Raspberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Strawberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Fruit on Top Yogurt- Blueberry
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Fruit on Top Yogurt-Strawberry
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Yogurt Maple
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Yogurt Vanilla
Nancy’s has additional products in the process of being verified; visit here for a full list of the current Nancy’s Non-GMO Project Verified Products.
With a line of more than 100 cultured dairy and soy products, Springfield Creamery is one of the few family owned and operated creameries in the US, currently spanning three generations of the Kesey family. Still committed to small batch production and doing things the old-fashioned way, all Nancy’s dairy and soy products are free of cane sugars, additives or anything artificial. It’s this commitment to providing the healthiest products to the largest number of people that has earned Springfield Creamery recognition, including Oregon Tilth’s “Organic Producer of The Year” award, Oregon Organic Coalition’s 2010 “Processor of The Year” award, Edible Portland’s 2012 Local Hero Award for Best “Food Artisan,” and Prevention Magazine’s 2014 “Cleanest Package Food Awards.”

Young Children Have Excess Saturated Fat And Sodium In Their Diets, New Research Finds

Specific foods consumed by young children are leading to excessive intake of saturated fat and sodium in their daily diets. New research presented today at the Experimental Biology 2014 conference shows cheese, hotdogs, whole and two percent milk are among the top foods and beverages contributing to saturated fat and sodium intakes of toddlers and preschoolers.

Since milk is key in children’s diets and a top contributor of many important nutrients including protein, calcium, vitamins A, D, B12; thiamin and riboflavin, the recommendation is not for parents to limit milk but instead to offer lower fat options such as 1 percent and skim. Other sources of saturated fat should be limited in the diets of young children.

The new findings are from a recent analysis of the 2008 Nestle Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS), the largest, most comprehensive dietary intake survey of parents and caregivers of young children. These insights may have implications for helping address childhood obesity among two- to four-year olds in the United States.

“The first years of a child’s life are a critical period of development. Instilling good eating habits during this time can help put a child on the path to a healthy future,” said Kathleen Reidy, DrPH, RD, and Head of Nutrition Science, Nestle Infant Nutrition. “Our findings indicate snacks are a significant portion of young children’s diets, and families can play an important role by planning nutritious snacks, especially when on-the-go.”

Data from the recent FITS analysis shows that while young children are snacking more frequently at home, snacks consumed outside the home add about 50 additional calories to their daily diets.

Drs. Reidy and Denise Deming of Nestle presented two abstracts on the recent analysis of FITS 2008 during the “Nutrition Education: Childhood Obesity Prevention I” symposium at the Experimental Biology 2014 conference.

Dr. Reidy, the lead author of an analysis examining top food sources contributing to energy (calories), saturated fat and sodium intake in the diets of toddlers (12-23 months) and preschoolers (24-47 months) found:

A few foods contribute almost 50 percent of daily calories – these include milk, cheese, bread and rolls, ready-to-eat cereals, poultry (chicken and turkey), butter, margarine or other fats.
Preschoolers are consuming nearly one-third, or about 400, of their total daily calories from solid fats and added sugars.
Top foods representing 70 percent of saturated fat intake include milk, cheese, butter, hot dogs/bacon, beef, poultry and cakes/cookies.
Top foods contributing almost 40 percent of young children’s sodium intake include milk, hot dogs and bacon, chicken/turkey, cheese, bread and rolls, crackers and ready-to-eat cereals. This intake equates to a child (24-47 months) consuming an average of 1,863 milligrams of sodium per day.
The new findings complement previously released research from FITS which showed 45 percent of toddlers and 78 percent of preschoolers consume more sodium than recommended.

Dr. Denise Deming analyzed dietary intake surveys for parents of 2,386 toddlers and preschoolers to lead an analysis on how snacking patterns among U.S. toddlers and preschoolers differ according to location. Dr. Deming found:

Many children consume milk, crackers and fresh fruits at snack time, but a variety of sweet snacks become the more popular choice when snacks are consumed away from home.
Snacks consumed away from home contributed about 50 more calories to the daily diet.
The FITS 2008 study evaluated the diets of 3,378 children from birth to four years of age. Study participants which included parents or primary caregivers of infants and young children completed twenty-four hour dietary recall surveys by telephone. For the study, parents or caregivers were allowed to define what foods children consumed as snacks and where these were consumed.