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The Cheese Guide is Here


Click the cover image above to be taken to The Cheese Guide, a Gourmet News publication.



Introducing Jarlsberg Cheese Crisps

Jarlsberg® Cheese Crisps™ are savory, crunchy baked crackers handcrafted in small batches and made with freshly shredded Jarlsberg Cheese sprinkled on top of the crunchy crackers just prior to being baked. New Jarlsberg Cheese Crisps takes the mild, mellow and nutty flavor of Jarlsberg Cheese and bakes it into a delicious crunchy snack. Each Crisp is topped with Jarlsberg Cheese, using the original Norwegian recipe, perfectly balanced with invigorating seasoning and spices for a savory, scrumptious and delectable bite.

Perfect for dipping, snacking, as part of a cheese board or as a crispy companion to a bowl of hot soup, Jarlsberg Cheese Crisps offer a variety of perfectly balanced flavors.

Jarlsberg Cheese Crisp flavors include: Rosemary & Olive Oil — perfectly balanced with invigorating rosemary and the subtle fruitiness of olive oil; Chipotle — thoughtfully paired with the natural smokiness of authentic chipotle and just the right amount of spiciness; Garlic & Herb — blended with the robust flavor of garlic and aromatic herbs, with Mediterranean Sea salt adding a burst of flavor. With only 120 calories or less per serving, only 3.5 or less grams of fat and 5 grams of protein and low cholesterol, these Jarlsberg Cheese Crisps are sure to fly off shelves in the deli section.

Jarlsberg Cheese Crisps have a suggested retail price of $3.99 – $4. 99 and are packed 12 bags per display ready case.

Face Rock Creamery Releases Clothbound Cheddar

Face RockFace Rock Creamery announces the first allocation of its premium clothbound cheddar. The 14-month aged cheddar is available from the Face Rock website and through select retail locations including New Seasons and Market of Choice in Oregon and Washington.

“Clothbound cheddar is a rare tradition for American cheesemakers, especially in the West,” shares Face Rock Head Cheesemaker Brad Sinko. “It’s a process that requires equal parts quality ingredients, patience and no small amount of alchemy. Aging cheese reveals the quality of the milk we use, and the terroir of Oregon’s southern coast comes through in a rich, slightly grassy and nutty flavor.”

Sinko’s toolkit is simple – milk, salt and cultures. While most clothbound cheddars are formed into blocks, Face Rock forms its cheese into a wheel.  And rather than coat the cloth binding with traditional lard or olive oil to promote the development of a porous rind that releases moisture, Sinko uses butter that he makes in house with the same milk that goes into Face Rock cheese.

Aging cheddar dramatically intensifies flavor and transforms the cheese into a creamy, slightly crumbly texture with small pockets of crunchy cheese crystals. After 14 months in a carefully controlled cave environment, Face Rock’s clothbound cheddar presents as a rich and exquisitely flaky cheese that delivers complex flavor. The deep creamy yellow hue of the cheese is the visual indicator of decadent high-quality butterfat content.

Butterfat quality is at the heart of any cheese’s flavor, and is linked directly to a dairy cow’s feed. Face Rock sources its milk from a single herd of Holstein, Brown Swiss and Jersey cows that graze year-round on nutrient-dense pastures located on Oregon’s rugged south coast, where nature simply has to work harder.

Rogue Creamery Cheeses Win Two Good Food Awards

Rogue Creamery wins twice at the 2016 Good Food Awards for its Flora Nelle and Rogue River Blue cheeses. Over 800 people attended the celebration including Slow Food Founder Carlo Petrini and Alice Waters. The Good Food Awards honors companies who have a reputation for making tasty, authentic and socially responsible products. The competition featured 1,937 entries and showcased regional flavors from across the USA. Rogue Creamery distinguished itself, receiving top scores from the 215 judges and passing a rigorous vetting to confirm that it met the Good Food Awards Standards; these standards include environmentally sound agricultural practices, good animal husbandry, transparency, and responsible supply chain relationships. “I am honored to be among this group of cheese makers recognized for their fine cheeses and their holistic, organic, biodynamic and sustainable make processes. Today, Cheese is being recognized along with the practices connected to creating it, and Rogue Creamery is proud that we make our cheese sustainably and organically in the GMO free Rogue Valley. Thank you to those cheesemakers who are a part of this change and Good Foods for putting it into their judging criteria which I now refer to as their manifesto,” said David Gremmels, President and Cheesemaker during his speech at the Good Food Awards.

Rogue Creamery is joined by two other Oregon Cheese Guild cheesemakers: Ancient Heritage Dairy and Goldin Artisan Goat Cheese, who were also winners and are helping Oregon lead the way toward creating a vibrant, delicious and sustainable food system.

Flora Nelle: This organic, natural- rinded, blue is set with calf rennet, has a crumbly, yet creamy texture, and combines savory, tropical, and sweet cream flavors. The result is a robust and piquant blue with subtle hints of blueberry and a rind that enhances the spicy-nutty and intensely blue flavors that truly capture the Rogue Valley Terroir.

Rogue River: Made annually, starting on the autumnal equinox, it is produced at the turn of the season and is made with richer, late-season milk. This blue, finished with pear-brandy soaked grape leaves, has a decidedly complex flavor that reflects the unique seasonal influences of the Rogue River Valley.

Guggisberg Sugarcreek Team Emmental Wheel Wins U.S. Cheese Championship


By Lorrie Baumann


IMG950609Cecylia Szewczyk is popping her buttons after the Emmental cheese made by her Sugarcreek team at Guggisberg Cheese was named the winner of the United States Championship Cheese Contest. The 200-pound wheel was chosen from among 1,894 entries in the contest, and it’s a cheese destined to lead Guggisberg Cheese’s product line in a direction that appeals to changing American tastes.

Of course, winning awards is nothing new for Guggisberg, which makes highly esteemed American Swiss-style cheeses that win championships almost routinely, but this award recognizes Guggisberg’s ability to turn its expertise toward traditional Swiss cheese styles with their robust flavors that were once considered too strong for American tastes. But as Americans have become more adventurous eaters, they’re demanding bolder flavors, and Emmental is back in favor. “In Switzerland, they are using different culture combinations that are able to break down the fat in cheese as it ages, and this produces the strongest notes that appreciated there. Here in the U.S. there is a tendency to use milder culture combinations that do not break down the fat , but more and more, Americans prefer pronounced flavors, and we would like to go in this direction,” Szewczyk explains.

Szewczyk led the team that developed the new cheese. Like the championship Emmental, she’s new to Guggisberg, although she’s been making cheese since 2006, when she was received her master’s degree in food biotechnology from the Polish university where she’d studied the food technology and food biotechnology. During the graduation ceremony in which she received her degree, she was approached by a Dutch company that was producing cultures for cheeses and offered a job immediately. She spent the next six years working in Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Germany and the Netherlands. Then the company sent her to Wisconsin to introduce its ingredients to the U.S. market. Two years later, the company’s management decided to change direction and scale back its efforts in the U.S. market.

By that time, though, Szewczyk had developed a friendly relationship with Guggisberg, which was one of her customers. “There was a mutual feeling,” she says. She approached Guggisberg with her thoughts about developing new cheeses, and the company took her on for a project that required testing a new pilot line that was an exact copy of the new production line Guggisberg Cheese was planning to install. “I came here, and we started playing with recipes,” she says. The 200-pound championship wheel was one of the first off that pilot line.

342-MMS-1426812044-attachment1-PART951426811913581The winning Emmental was aged for just three months with a special cheese coating that allowed the cheese to breathe and release gases and moisture that naturally form within the cheese as it ages instead of the plastic wrapping that’s commonly used in the U.S. “There is a tremendous difference if you let cheese age the natural way, if there are no plastic bags to create a barrier,” Szewczyk says.

“The flavor that we managed to develop there was really outstanding. We were so happy,” she says. “We thought we wouldn’t stand a chance against other Emmentals because of the short aging. In only three months, we were able to develop the flavor. Considering the fact that this was one of the first trials, I’ll say we were very lucky.”




Arthur Schuman to Showcase Award-Winning “Best of Class” Cheeses at Winter Fancy Food Show

Arthur Schuman, Inc. will be showcasing its 2015 award-winning “Best of Class” cheeses at the Winter Fancy Food Show on January 17-19 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Arthur Schuman, Inc., a fourth-generation family company located in Fairfield, New Jersey, is recognized as a leader within the specialty cheese industry as both an importer and a producer of hard domestic cheeses for foodservice operators, retailers and distributors.

Arthur Schuman, Inc. invites you to stop by and taste these award-winning “Best of Class” cheeses that include:

Cello Riserva Copper Kettle Parmesan – This parmesan cheese has a unique rich and nutty flavor that earned a first place award at the 2015 American Cheese Society Competition. Made with strict traditional methods, this award-winning cheese is produced in Arthur Schuman’s Lake Country Dairy facility using the highest quality milk. The cheese’s robust flavor and distinct color comes from our commitment to using a copper kettle in the cheese making process and natural sea salt in the brining process. Each wheel is hand selected by a team of expert cheese graders as soon as its flavor has reached the peak of perfection.

Cello Riserva Artisan Parmesan – Produced by expert cheesemakers, Cello Riserva Artisan Parmesan is made with the freshest milk from local Wisconsin farms and carefully crafted using traditional techniques. Each wheel is naturally aged for over 12 months, developing a deep, nutty, sweet flavor. The complex composition of Cello Riserva Artisan Parmesan earned the second place award at the 2015 American Cheese Society Competition.

Cello Whisps Parmesan Cheese Crisps – Cello Whisps Parmesan Cheese Crisps are an innovative snack made entirely of one delicious ingredient, 100 percent pure Parmesan cheese. Made with award-winning Cello Copper Kettle Parmesan Cheese aged 14 months, Cello Whisps provide health conscious consumers of all ages with a healthy snack alternative that also taste great. Cello Whisps are all-natural wholesome crisps baked into flavorful, airy, crispy bites. They are an excellent source of protein and calcium and are gluten free. One serving is just 100 calories.

Cello Whisps have gained a strong fan following: consumers try them once and fall in love. Even the cheese experts love Cello Whisps; their delicious flavor earned the second place award at the 2015 U.S. Championship Cheese Contest.

“2015 was a very rewarding year for Arthur Schuman, and we are already looking forward to launching our new Yellow Door Creamery Hand-Rubbed Fontina and Yellow Door Creamery Brilliant Blue cheeses in 2016,” said lIana Fischer, Vice President of Innovation & Strategy at Arthur Schuman, Inc. “We pride ourselves in offering new and innovative cheese products into the specialty market.”

Arthur Schuman, Inc. will also be showcasing hand selected imported cheeses including Entremont, Dodoni, Brugge, Busti, Mario Costa, Zanetti, Garofalo, and Pastures of Eden.

Grafton Village Cheese Introduces Truffle Cheddar

Grafton Village Cheese, a business of the nonprofit Windham Foundation in Grafton, Vermont, announces the introduction of Truffle Cheddar, an aged cheddar cheese containing Italian truffles. The new cheese joins the company’s Grafton Village line of aged and flavored cheddars.
Grafton Village truffle cheddarAs with all Grafton cheddars, the new Truffle Cheddar is handmade using premium raw milk from small local family farms and aged a minimum of 60 days. It maintains a delicate balance between the earthy flavors of truffle and the smooth rich bite of aged Vermont cheddar.
Truffle cheddar is an ideal cheese for the centerpiece on a cheeseboard or in cooking applications including those with eggs, potatoes, soups, pasta, risotto and red meat. It is nicely paired with brown ales and with Barolo, Orvieto and Pinot Noir wines.
The new Truffle Cheddar is available in 10 and five pound blocks, 8-ounce bars and 4-ounce bars. The cheese is now available at select specialty markets and grocers nationwide.

Finca Pascualete La Retorta Wins Super Gold at World Cheese Awards


Finca Pascualete La Retorta was awarded Super Gold and named Best Cheese from Spain at the 2015 World Cheese Awards. This creamy raw sheep’s milk cheese is made in the traditional method of curdling milk with dried wild thistle flowers.

Finca Pascualete uses milk from its own flock and stays true to the time-honored recipe which requires daily turning by hand. The resulting aromatic cheese is praised for a smooth yet persistent flavor. The wild flowers lend a hint of bitterness to balance its remarkable richness.

Weighing in at 140 grams, La Retorta has understated packaging, wrapped in corrugated cardboard and tied with raffia string. The cheese should be brought to room temperature for service, when the top rind can be cut off as if it were a lid.

This popular La Retorta has gained notice not just for its flavor and quality, but also for its fascinating origins. Established in the 1940s by Luis Figueroa and Aline Griffith, Finca Pascualete is located on a famed Extremadura estate that has been in Figueroa family for nearly 800 years; the palacio itself was built in Roman times. The rich history of the estate took on a new life through Figueroa and Griffith. Having met when Griffith was working as a CIA agent, the couple settled into life in northern Spain, where they became known as the Count and Countess of Romanones.

“The cheese showcases the singularity of the land, the estate where the flock grazes and the city of Trujillo. It is a farming and agricultural project with a history dating back to 1232 which gained new dimension in 2010 with the inauguration of the cheese factory, achieving important international recognition,” said Cheesemaker Juan Figueroa, a grandson of the founders.

Finca Pascualete’s La Retorta was one of 2,727 entries from around the world to be judged at the World Cheese Awards, where 250 expert judges worked in teams of four to identify medal-winning cheeses. The super gold medal was reserved for each team’s favorite cheese. The 62 super gold cheeses were then ranked by a second panel of judges to award “best of” categories and to decide the world champion.

Finca Pascualete La Retorta is distributed in the United States by the Rogers Collection, which imports and distributes responsibly sourced ingredients of distinctive quality created by generational food producers from small farms rich in traditions and flavors.

For more information, call 207.828.2000, email or visit


Stonyfield Organic Introduces Limited Edition Oh My Yog! in New England Maple Flavor

Stonyfield is bringing out the latest offering in its Oh My Yog! lineup, limited edition New England Maple, just in time for National Maple Syrup Day on December 17. Made from organic whole milk and featuring maple syrup sourced from New Englanders who have a passion for making organic syrup, Oh My Yog! New England Maple is an everyday indulgence consumers can feel good about choosing.

Stonyfield’s Oh My Yog! line is known for its unique three-layer format – and with maple on the bottom, honey-infused yogurt in the middle and a decadent layer of cream on top – New England Maple is no exception.

“Oh My Yog! has been a big hit with consumers since we introduced the product earlier this year,” shared Lizzie Conover, Brand Manager for Stonyfield. “It’s the perfect blend of rich, satisfying flavors and wholesome organic whole milk. With the limited edition New England Maple flavor, we are thrilled to celebrate seasonal ingredients found right here in our own backyard in New England.”

Stonyfield’s Oh My Yog! New England Maple is organic, certified gluten-free, non-GMO and made without the use of toxic persistent pesticides, artificial hormones and antibiotics. Each 6 oz. container of Oh My Yog! New England Maple contains seven grams of protein per cup.

Easy to recognize in the yogurt aisle thanks to its colorfully striped packaging that was inspired by the three layers inside, Oh My Yog! New England Maple is available at select retailers nationwide from December 2015-March 2016 and retails for the suggested price of $1.59. For those looking for another creamy treat, Oh My Yog! also comes in five other decadent varieties: Madagascar Vanilla Bean, Wild Quebec Blueberry, Pacific Coast Strawberry, Gingered Pear, and Apple Cinnamon.

Selling Cheese in Music City, USA


By Lorrie Baumann

This is a good time, and Nashville is a good place for a tiny cheese shop that operates as a cut-to-order counter inside a specialty butcher shop, says Kathleen Cotter, Owner of The Bloomy Rind.

The Bloomy Rind is tucked inside Porter Road Butcher, a whole-animal butcher shop that specializes in locally sourced pasture-raised meats. The pairing of a cheese shop and specialty butchers came about after a local farmer introduced Cotter, who was selling cheeses at local farmers markets, to business partners James Peisker and Chris Carter, who had been working together as caterers when they realized that what Nashville lacked was a good source of high-quality local meat. They were getting ready to open a butcher shop in East Nashville to meet that need, and when they met Cotter, it just seemed right that they might also team up with Cotter and her specialty cheeses. “I pitched the idea to sell cheese in their shop. At that point we didn’t know what the setup would look like,” Cotter says. “As their plans for the space crystalized, they worked a small cheese counter for The Bloomy Rind into their layout. So I was able to open up inside Porter Road instead of having to find the funds to build out my own shop.”

Cotter can’t focus on local cheeses the way Peisker and Carter focus on local meats because there just aren’t enough cheeses made locally to Nashville to meet her customers’ needs, but all three partners share a similar passion for sustainably produced foods. “Our philosophy and our passion were very much in alignment,” she says.

Part of their job is educating Nashville residents who are more accustomed to shopping for all their food needs at conventional grocery stores rather than stopping in at a variety of specialty shops, Cotter says. “It’s a change of habit to have to make an extra stop for specialty meats and cheese. But people are more and more willing to make that extra stop as the desire grows to know where their food comes from and how it was produced.”

There’s also a population who comes in and says they grew up going to the butcher shop,” she adds. “They come back to that experience, which is cool…. We’re having a lot of people moving here from big cities, where they’re a little more used to specialty shops and come in looking for a personalized cheese experience.”

Her corner of the 1,500 square foot store houses a cheese case and a cutting table, and she shares a market area where she has some logs of chevre and a few other cheese accompaniments in a grab-and-go case. She carries 40 to 50 different cheeses in the case, all cut to order. At the moment, she has one particular favorite cheese in her case: a wheel of extra-aged St. Malachi from the Farm at Doe Run that she acquired when the farm sold extra wheels of a cheese they were entering in the American Cheese Society awards competition. “It’s sort of an aged cheddar meets aged Gouda, firm and crystally and brown-buttery,” Cotter says. “I find cheese is very much a mood thing. I don’t know if other people feel the same way. Sometimes you want a cheese that’s mild, fresh and creamy. Other times you want something with a more challenging profile and stronger flavors.”

In addition to her retail business, she operates a thriving wholesale business in which she works with about 20 restaurants in the city on a regular basis. “That helps me to move product through the case so inventory never sits fr too long and I can rotate the selection more frequently,” she says. “The combination of retail and wholesale also makes it possible to earn a living, which can be tough as an independent cheese retailer.” The wholesale business has become more integral to the shop than Cotter expected, which has been a pleasant surprise, she said. “It’s another avenue to market the cheese counter. If people order a Bloomy Rind cheese plate at a restaurant and enjoy it, then they come into the shop and want to try other things as well.”

As she’s grown her business at the shop, Cotter has also founded the Southern Artisan Cheese Festival, which started five years ago and which she has organized each year since then. “It’s been fun to watch that grow and to be a part of growing the awareness of Southern cheese,” she says. “I think Southern cheeses were under appreciated, but along with greater appreciation of Southern food in general, people are becoming more aware of it. We have people from different cities asking for Southern cheeses to be sent to them. It’s on the upswing. People are really excited about it.”

Nashville’s growing food culture makes this an exciting time to be selling specialty cheese there, Cotter says. “I happened to get into this at a good time when American cheeses are getting better and better and better. There are many great cheeses to introduce people to and chefs are more into interesting domestic cheeses,” she says. “Nashville has become the ‘It Girl’ of food and is attracting more chefs, although we already had good ones, as well as visitors who are interested in good food. It’s a fun time to be in Nashville and to be in cheese.”


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