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Dairy

Nancy’s Announces Non-GMO Project Verification

The family owned and operated Springfield Creamery announced today that its legacy brand of Nancy’s Organic Dairy products is now Non-GMO Project verified through the Non-GMO Project – making the Nancy’s brand one of the few Non-GMO Project verified organic yogurts with national distribution. Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Kefir and Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Cultured Cottage Cheese are the first Non-GMO Project verified kefir and cottage cheese currently on the market.

“Folks continue to be concerned about the possibility of GMOs in their foods and we share this concern, which is why we have taken the steps to verify that our cultured organic dairy products do not contain GMO ingredients. The Non-GMO Project verification gives us that extra level of transparency that our customers are looking for,” says Co-owner Sheryl Kesey Thompson, of the family-owned and operated Springfield Creamery. “Getting verified is a very thorough process, so we are pleased to be able to share this news with our customers.”
Verification by the Non-GMO Project is a rigorous program that includes traceability, segregation, and testing at critical control points. Securing Verified status confirms Nancy’s Organic Dairy products are produced in compliance with the Non-GMO Project Standard, meaning that ongoing testing of all GMO risk ingredients, facility inspections and annual audits take place to ensure that the company is meeting standards for GMO avoidance.
The Non-GMO Project now verifies that the following Nancy’s products are Non-GMO Project Verified:
  • Nancy’s Organic Whole Milk Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Plain Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Blackberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Blueberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Raspberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Probiotic Strawberry Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Whole Milk Probiotic Plain Greek Yogurt
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Cultured Cottage Cheese
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Cultured Cottage Cheese Fruit on Top-Strawberry
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Plain Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Blackberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Blueberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Peach Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Raspberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Lowfat Strawberry Kefir
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Fruit on Top Yogurt- Blueberry
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Fruit on Top Yogurt-Strawberry
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Yogurt Maple
  • Nancy’s Organic Nonfat Yogurt Vanilla
Nancy’s has additional products in the process of being verified; visit here for a full list of the current Nancy’s Non-GMO Project Verified Products.
With a line of more than 100 cultured dairy and soy products, Springfield Creamery is one of the few family owned and operated creameries in the US, currently spanning three generations of the Kesey family. Still committed to small batch production and doing things the old-fashioned way, all Nancy’s dairy and soy products are free of cane sugars, additives or anything artificial. It’s this commitment to providing the healthiest products to the largest number of people that has earned Springfield Creamery recognition, including Oregon Tilth’s “Organic Producer of The Year” award, Oregon Organic Coalition’s 2010 “Processor of The Year” award, Edible Portland’s 2012 Local Hero Award for Best “Food Artisan,” and Prevention Magazine’s 2014 “Cleanest Package Food Awards.”

Young Children Have Excess Saturated Fat And Sodium In Their Diets, New Research Finds

Specific foods consumed by young children are leading to excessive intake of saturated fat and sodium in their daily diets. New research presented today at the Experimental Biology 2014 conference shows cheese, hotdogs, whole and two percent milk are among the top foods and beverages contributing to saturated fat and sodium intakes of toddlers and preschoolers.

Since milk is key in children’s diets and a top contributor of many important nutrients including protein, calcium, vitamins A, D, B12; thiamin and riboflavin, the recommendation is not for parents to limit milk but instead to offer lower fat options such as 1 percent and skim. Other sources of saturated fat should be limited in the diets of young children.

The new findings are from a recent analysis of the 2008 Nestle Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS), the largest, most comprehensive dietary intake survey of parents and caregivers of young children. These insights may have implications for helping address childhood obesity among two- to four-year olds in the United States.

“The first years of a child’s life are a critical period of development. Instilling good eating habits during this time can help put a child on the path to a healthy future,” said Kathleen Reidy, DrPH, RD, and Head of Nutrition Science, Nestle Infant Nutrition. “Our findings indicate snacks are a significant portion of young children’s diets, and families can play an important role by planning nutritious snacks, especially when on-the-go.”

Data from the recent FITS analysis shows that while young children are snacking more frequently at home, snacks consumed outside the home add about 50 additional calories to their daily diets.

Drs. Reidy and Denise Deming of Nestle presented two abstracts on the recent analysis of FITS 2008 during the “Nutrition Education: Childhood Obesity Prevention I” symposium at the Experimental Biology 2014 conference.

Dr. Reidy, the lead author of an analysis examining top food sources contributing to energy (calories), saturated fat and sodium intake in the diets of toddlers (12-23 months) and preschoolers (24-47 months) found:

A few foods contribute almost 50 percent of daily calories – these include milk, cheese, bread and rolls, ready-to-eat cereals, poultry (chicken and turkey), butter, margarine or other fats.
Preschoolers are consuming nearly one-third, or about 400, of their total daily calories from solid fats and added sugars.
Top foods representing 70 percent of saturated fat intake include milk, cheese, butter, hot dogs/bacon, beef, poultry and cakes/cookies.
Top foods contributing almost 40 percent of young children’s sodium intake include milk, hot dogs and bacon, chicken/turkey, cheese, bread and rolls, crackers and ready-to-eat cereals. This intake equates to a child (24-47 months) consuming an average of 1,863 milligrams of sodium per day.
The new findings complement previously released research from FITS which showed 45 percent of toddlers and 78 percent of preschoolers consume more sodium than recommended.

Dr. Denise Deming analyzed dietary intake surveys for parents of 2,386 toddlers and preschoolers to lead an analysis on how snacking patterns among U.S. toddlers and preschoolers differ according to location. Dr. Deming found:

Many children consume milk, crackers and fresh fruits at snack time, but a variety of sweet snacks become the more popular choice when snacks are consumed away from home.
Snacks consumed away from home contributed about 50 more calories to the daily diet.
The FITS 2008 study evaluated the diets of 3,378 children from birth to four years of age. Study participants which included parents or primary caregivers of infants and young children completed twenty-four hour dietary recall surveys by telephone. For the study, parents or caregivers were allowed to define what foods children consumed as snacks and where these were consumed.

Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker Program Announces 2014 Graduates

With its 2014 graduating class, the Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker® program celebrates 20 years of providing the nation’s only advanced training course of its kind for veteran cheesemakers. This year’s class includes four new Wisconsin Master Cheesemakers and three veteran Masters who repeated the program to earn certification in additional cheese varieties.

The four new Wisconsin Master Cheesemakers are:

  • Mike Brennenstuhl, Great Lakes Cheese Seymour, Inc., Seymour, Wis., certified for Blue and Gorgonzola
  • Pat Doell, Agropur, Inc., Luxemburg, certified for Mozzarella and Provolone
  • Brian Renard, Renard’s Rosewood Dairy/Renard’s Cheese, Algoma, Wis., certified for Cheddar and Colby
  • Chris Renard, Renard’s Rosewood Dairy/Renard’s Cheese, Algoma, Wis., certified for Cheddar and Mozzarella

Returning graduates in the 2014 class are:

  • Mark Gustafson, Sartori Company, Plymouth, Wis., now certified for Fontina and Romano, as well as Parmesan and Asiago
  • Paul Reigle, Maple Leaf Cheese, Monroe, now certified for Cheddar in addition to Yogurt Cheese and Monterey Jack
  • Bruce Workman, Edelweiss Creamery, Monticello, now certified for Cheddar and Gouda in addition to Baby Swiss, Brick, Butterkäse, Emmental, Gruyère, Havarti, Muenster, Raclette and Specialty Swiss (low-sodium, low-fat lacy Swiss).

The graduates will be honored and presented with Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker medallions at a ceremony during the International Cheese Technology Exposition in Milwaukee on April 24.

“We congratulate the 2014 graduates and are proud to celebrate the 20th anniversary of this unique program. Those who have earned the title of Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker have such a dedication to their craft and pride in what they’ve achieved,” says James Robson, CEO of the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (WMMB). “The impact of the program on them personally, as well as on their companies and the Wisconsin cheese industry has been immeasurable.”

Established in 1994 through a joint partnership of the Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research, UW-Extension and WMMB, the Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker program is the most formalized, advanced training program in the nation. Patterned after European programs, it is administered by the Center for Dairy Research and funded by Wisconsin dairy producers, through WMMB. Applicants to the program must be active, licensed Wisconsin cheesemakers with at least 10 years of experience. Cheesemakers can earn certification in up to two cheese varieties each time they enroll in the three-year program and must have been making those varieties as a licensed cheesemaker for a minimum of five years prior to entering the program. Once certified, they’re entitled to use the distinctive Master’s Mark® on their product labels and in other marketing materials.

 

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