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Sioux Natural Hatches Veggan, a Gluten-Free, Plant-Based Egg Substitute

Sioux Natural is introducing Veggan, a plant-based egg substitute that matches the nutritional and functional properties of whole eggs in baking, while minimizing the health risks we’ve come to know with conventional eggs. The new product comes much to the relief of chickens, vegans, and those with egg allergies everywhere as well as those watching their cholesterol.

“We are proud to offer a clean, plant-based, allergen-free egg alternative in a time where large-scale egg production can’t keep up with maintaining the health and safety of their flocks or their eggs,” said Paula Persinger, President of Sioux Natural, LLC. “Veggan is a natural choice for people avoiding animal products, allergens, and GMOs, and for the companies who’d like to make food for them while also benefiting from cost and risk reduction.”

Since Veggan is created through sustainable, minimally processed, GRAS-certified ingredients, it virtually eliminates the risks we’ve come to recognize—and bear—from large-scale egg production practices. The product offers identical performance: Veggan offers a 1:1 volume and weight substitution, which eliminates the need for additional allowances or reformulations.

Veggan’s ingredients are available and easily sourced at a cost savings to eggs. Without having to rely on flock health, using plant-based Veggan minimizes the huge price increases that occur when chicken populations are fighting widespread illness, like the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in 2015. Not only is Veggan immune to bird illnesses, it also substantially reduces the microbial risk for salmonella and listeria in a way that large-scale egg production simply can’t. When eggs get recalled, so do every product and recipe they touch. Using Veggan helps preserve corporate bottom lines, company reputations, and the health of the end-consumer.

Replacing eggs with Veggan also allows the baking industry to expand their product offering to customers with gluten, cholesterol, and environmental sensitivities. With its amazing functionality, neutral flavor profile, and clean label, Veggan is a clear choice for waffles, donuts, breads, cakes, muffins, cookies, and more.

“It’s always refreshing when science can make good, wholesome food healthier and more accessible,” adds Persinger. “And it’s exciting to see a product that has just as many applications in Grandma’s kitchen as it does in large-scale baking operations.”

Rice Brands Earn Non-GMO Certification

Riviana Foods Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Ebro Foods, S.A., has announced that its leading rice brands: Minute®, Carolina®, Mahatma®, Success®, Blue Ribbon®, Comet®, Adolphus®, Gourmet House® and RiceSelect® have earned the Non‐GMO Project Verification on its rice products. This verification is yet another way Riviana is demonstrating its commitment to providing consumers with up-to-date product information and responding to consumer-driven trends.

“Consumers want to know not just what’s in their food but also where it comes from,” said Paul Galvani, Senior Vice President of Marketing of Riviana. “In the future, companies will succeed by having full ingredient transparency, allowing consumers to make informed choices. Brands that are silent on the issue run a risk of losing consumer trust. We are proud to be leading the way in the rice category earning Non-GMO Project Verification,” said Galvani.

Over 175 rice products from Minute, Carolina, Mahatma, Success, Blue Ribbon, Comet, Adolphus, Gourmet House and RiceSelect will carry the new verification seal on the front of the packages, where it is easy to spot. Riviana rice products bearing the Non-GMO Project Verified logo began appearing on grocery shelves across the country in 2016.

GrandyOats Launches Gluten-free Line

GrandyOats, a Maine maker of organic cereals and snacks, is launching a line of certified gluten-free products from its dedicated gluten-free production area in its new 100 percent solar powered headquarters in Hiram, Maine. This spring, GrandyOats will launch its certified gluten-free line starting with 12 skus of bulk trail mixes and nuts followed by two packaged products. GrandyOats expects to launch more certified gluten-free products later in the year.

Specifically, GrandyOats trail mixes and roasted nuts including High Antioxidant Trail Mix, Garlic Herb Cashews, Maple Roasted Cashews, and Nori Sesame Cashews, will all be certified gluten-free. GrandyOats granola will be next to go gluten-free, with its popular Coconut + Fruit Granola earning the designation shortly thereafter, followed by organic oatmeal and other products.

“Gluten-free will be a strong focus for us throughout 2016 and into 2017,” said Aaron Anker, Chief Granola Officer, GrandyOats. “Our customers have been asking us for organic, certified gluten-free granola and snacks, and in our new designated gluten-free space we are happy we can deliver.”

Consumers are choosing gluten-free products for many reasons, including disease, sensitivity, allergy, and other health concerns. In addition, gluten-free consumers are seeking additional benefits, such as organic and GMO-free, that go beyond gluten-free. Value-added propositions including current low-sugar and savory culinary trends, factor in highly as well. Improving the quality and selection of gluten-free foods available in mainstream channels will help sales in the category grow nearly 1.5 times through 2019, according to market analysis by Packaged Facts.

Like all GrandyOats cereals and snacks, the new gluten-free products are certified organic, non-GMO, and made by hand in small batches by the GrandyOats family in their 100 percent solar powered bakery in rural Maine.

Organic Granola has long been the keystone product of the GrandyOats bakery. GrandyOats Coconut + Fruit Granola is a savory-sweet, organic granola with a hearty blend of organic oats, rich coconut flakes, fruit juice-sweetened dried cranberries, plump raisins, wild flower honey, coriander and sea salt. GrandyOats Coconut + Fruit Granola will be gluten-free in both bulk and packaged offerings.

GrandyOats never uses refined sugar or artificial ingredients in its recipes. Both new flavors are sweetened with real, wild flower honey and have organic apple juice sweetened fruit.  Certified organic by Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA) and certified Kosher, GrandyOats never uses products that contain antibiotics, synthetic hormones, toxic pesticides or GMOs. All GrandyOats organic granola is made with organic sunflower oil and does not use canola oil.

In November 2015, GrandyOats became the first net zero food production facility on the East Coast by constructing a state-of-the-art, 100 percent solar powered facility in rural Maine. The GrandyOats solar electric system will produce on average 95,622 kWh of clean, renewable electricity annually. It will offset over 145,000 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions each year, or the amount of miles equivalent to driving from Maine to San Francisco and back 25 times.

GrandyOats achieved 28 percent growth in 2015 producing 1.2 million pounds of organic granola, trail mix and roasted nuts and generating 5.3 million in sales. Also in 2015, GrandyOats expanded its food service presence in higher education cafeterias as the first independent, organic brand to be served at more than 75 colleges and universities from University of Maine at Orono to The State University of New York (SUNY) Buffalo. With the gluten-free product line, they hope to reach even more “real granolas.”

“We’ve been fortunate enough to grow slowly but steadily, while still making our products by hand in small batches in rural Maine,” continued Anker.

Consistent with its commitment to being net zero, GrandyOats will have a 100 percent solar-powered booth at Natural Products ExpoWest Conference in Anaheim, CA at booth #3313.

Certified organic by Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA) and certified kosher, GrandyOats never uses products that contain antibiotics, synthetic hormones, toxic pesticides or GMOs. A wide range of GrandyOats organic cereals and snacks in a variety of sizes are available nationwide in natural food stores, food cooperatives, major grocery chains and online at www.grandyoats.com.

Genetic ID and CERT ID Offer Gluten Free Verification Program

 

Genetic ID NA, Inc., in conjunction with CERT ID, announce the addition of gluten-free verification services to their portfolio of food safety and food quality testing and certification services. Gluten-free is one of the fastest-growing categories in the food and beverage market.

The gluten-free verification services are based on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) final ruling on the use of a gluten-free claim and are intended for products sold in North America. Services are risk-based and supported by a validated sampling and testing regimen. “We continue to identify value-added opportunities for our customers, and this program was specifically designed to provide the flexibility that the market demands,” said Dr. Heather Secrist, CEO of Genetic ID. “Companies can choose an individual service, such as testing, or adopt a comprehensive gluten-free certification and testing program where the CERT ID Gluten-free Trustmark can be applied to a product.”

“Our Gluten-free Product Certification Program is designed as an addendum to recognized system certifications such as organic, Non-GMO Project, and Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), said Rhonda Wellik, CEO of CERT ID. “This effectively allows companies to realize efficiencies and cost-savings when seeking product certification.”

The gluten-free verification services provide a third-party approach regarding label claims, and communicate a company’s commitment to producing safe, gluten-free products for consumers. The new services included in the Gluten-free Certification Program incorporate the rigor and reliability that Genetic ID and CERT ID’s customers have come to rely on.

For more information about Genetic ID and CERT ID, visit www.genetic-id.com and www.cert-id.com.

 

On the Frontier in the Land of Gluten-Free

 

What’s in a name? For Against The Grain, a lot. It’s gluten-free and grain-free, but it has always had a slightly different way of navigating the food landscape. Now in its tenth year, it has been on the frontier of gluten-free since the beginning. Long before it was fashionable, it sought out high quality, simple ingredients, and rejected industrial formulations. Now everyone is jumping on the bandwagon. It has always made everything in its own dedicated gluten-free and nut-free facility, right down to its unique nut-free pesto sauce. Innovation at Against The Grain doesn’t come from food scientists and focus groups; it comes from a whole company of foodies eating every day what we make. For Against The Grain, taste is paramount, and it all begins with the finest ingredients and a staff that cares deeply about its real-food mission.

Against The Grain has talked with too many gluten intolerant consumers to ever believe the gluten-free diet is a fad. Yes, it has been through phases. Gluten-Free 1.0 was all about dry, rice flour-based formulations. These products served a need, but only for those on a restricted diet. Increased interest in a gluten-free diet came with Gluten Free 2.0, but so did the addition of all kinds of engineered ingredients to make products taste better and last longer, like gums, stabilizers, anti-molding agents and enzymes. Now there’s Gluten Free 3.0: not only are consumers looking for transparent ingredients, but vegetable-based “free from” products as well. The trick is to make foods without an ingredient deck of industrial formulations like protein isolates, methylcellulose and gelling agents one can neither spell nor pronounce. Against The Grain is sticking with its “real food” mission, so look to it later in 2016 to be pushing the boundaries of the free-from, vegetable-based, no funky ingredients frontier.

At Expo West this year, it is introducing its new single-serve flatbread pizza/wrap. Baked, it is a grain-free pizza; warmed and folded it’s a hand-held wrap. Initially available in Classic (tomato and cheese) and Fiesta (black bean, sour cream, lime and spices) flavors, it’s a great healthy snack or an ideal platform for any meal. The crust features light buckwheat, sourced directly from a farmer who grows and mills this naturally pesticide-free, amazingly smooth and neutral-tasting flour. Against The Grain doesn’t care that ancient grains are trending; it believes in the merits of a grain-free diet, and light buckwheat flour, from the seed of a plant in the rhubarb family, that is nutritious, highly versatile and great tasting. As always, it is consumer-driven rather than investor- and shareholder-driven. It will continue to go against the grain, including ancient ones.

 

 

Boulder Canyon Introduces Guilt-Free Popcorn

Resolutions to eat healthier remain intact at this time of year, and fans of salty snacks have a new reason to celebrate with the introduction of Boulder Canyon Authentic Foods’ new Real Thin™ Pop line of ready-to-eat popcorn. Featuring premium oils, including olive, avocado and coconut, and seasonings that are applied with a revolutionary new method (compared to traditional tumble mixing) results in a full-flavor snack experience that has remarkably fewer calories and fat than the leading popcorn brands.

Boulder CanyonBoulder Canyon Real Thin Pop stands apart from the numerous guilt-free salty snacks on the market today not only because of its rare combination of full-flavored taste and low-calorie impact, but the fact that this has been achieved using only real food ingredients and a minimally-processed approach to manufacturing.

Available in three varieties, including Olive Oil/White Cheddar, Avocado Oil/Sea Salt and Coconut Oil/Sea Salt, Real Thin Pop arrives at leading grocery stores and supermarkets nationwide this month with a suggested retail price of $3.99 per 4.15-ounce bag. Each package contains four servings.

Stonyfield Organic Introduces New Trio of Whole Milk Products

Stonyfield, the leading organic yogurt maker, is introducing three new products aimed at providing customers more ways to enjoy the delicious flavor and nutritional richness of organic whole milk yogurt. With a new line of 100 percent grassfed yogurts and new whole milk offerings for already popular Stonyfield Greek and Pouch lines, consumers have even more reasons to reach for yogurt.

“During Stonyfield’s first years, plain, simple, whole-milk yogurt was all that we made. In the 90s, diet fads led consumers to fear fat,” said Ana Milicevic, Brand Manager from Stonyfield. “But that simply wasn’t the whole story. Since whole milk provides a wealth of benefits –and tastes great – we’re excited to satisfy an increased demand and return to our roots.”

“Organic whole milk yogurt is an incredibly satisfying, traditional food – something I think many Americans are starting to embrace,” says Drew Ramsey, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of psychiatry at Columbia University and one of psychiatry’s leading proponents of using dietary changes to help balance moods, sharpen brain function and improve mental health. “Plus, it’s a satisfying way to get important nutrients like protein and calcium.”

The Next Chapter: Grassfed Yogurt

Stonyfield’s new organic 100% Grassfed Whole Milk yogurt begins in the pasture, with milk from cows who graze exclusively on grass. Rich and creamy and filled with all the delicious, nutritional qualities of full fat dairy, this cup of yogurt is the perfect choice for a whole breakfast or snack.

Stonyfield is proud to be sourcing its organic 100 percent grassfed whole milk from Maple Hill Creamery, another company passionate about producing milk in a way that is good for the planet, good for the cows and good for people.

Maple Hill Creamery cows are 100 percent grassfed, meaning they eat all grass, all the time (no grain, no corn) throughout the year (even in winter!) to produce whole milk with a rich, unique taste. In collaboration, Stonyfield and Maple Hill Creamery seek to make organic 100 percent grassfed yogurt accessible on a national level to more people than ever before.

To help consumers identify 100 percent grassfed vs. other varieties of grassfed (supplemented with corn or grain), Stonyfield has achieved independent Pennsylvania Certified Organic (PCO) accreditation, noted right on the label of every yogurt cup. Stonyfield Organic 100% Grassfed Whole Milk Yogurt is currently available at Whole Foods Markets nationwide in 6-ounce Vanilla, Strawberry, Blueberry and Plain cups as well as 24-ounce Plain and Vanilla.

The Plot Thickens with Whole Milk Greek

Adding to its Greek nonfat yogurt family, Stonyfield’s Whole Milk Greek delivers a rich, creamy taste that only comes from full-fat dairy. The yogurt is packed with calcium and protein and new fruit-filled sidecars allow for flavor personalization. Available at national retailers in 5.3-ounce cups of Plain, Strawberry, Vanilla, Blueberry, Honey and Cherry, Stonyfield will also offer Whole Milk Greek in quarts of Plain and Vanilla – perfect for families or recipe creation.

A Conveniently Packaged Ending

The whole story concludes with a solution for bringing whole milk goodness on the go – with the introduction of Stonyfield Organic Whole Milk Pouches. The entire family will love being able to grab a convenient, hand-held pouch for a delicious, satisfying snack on the go. Stonyfield Whole Milk Pouches are available nationwide in Pear Spinach Mango, Strawberry Beet Berry, Vanilla and Blueberry – all available in single serve pouches. Additionally, each flavor except blueberry is offered in a four-pack as well.

GNP Company Flagship Chicken Brand to Add “No Antibiotics-Ever” and Humane Certified Attributes

GNP Company®, a provider of premium natural chicken in the Midwest, will be adding two new attributes to chicken products sold under its flagship Gold’n Plump®brand. The attributes include “No Antibiotics–Ever” and the American Humane Certified™ farm program seal. The first Gold’n Plump products featuring both of these claims will hit store shelves in March, with more added in the summer. The company will gradually extend these attributes to the entire Gold’n Plump line, with the goal of all products to offer them by 2019.

“The demand for products raised humanely and with no antibiotics ever is growing,” said Julie Berling, Director of Strategic Communications and Insights for GNP Company. “One study shows as many as 42 percent of chicken consumers say ‘hormone- or antibiotic-free’ is an important factor to them. And 92.6 percent of consumers find it very important to buy humanely raised meats.”

The Natural Resources Defense Council reports chicken raised without routine use of antibiotics is no longer a niche business and that chicken leads the meat product movement towards reduced antibiotics use.

Not All Claims Equal
The company says its flagship Gold’n Plump brand will be one of the first mainstream chicken brands to fully transition its entire product line to be raised without antibiotics of any kind.

“Not all antibiotic claims are created equal,” explains Brian Roelofs, Vice President of Sales, Marketing and Service for GNP Company. “Many companies are making statements about eliminating the use of antibiotics medically important to humans. GNP Company’s move is taking that further—eliminating all antibiotics of any kind for its All Natural Gold’n Plump products now, with the remaining portfolio to follow.”

The USDA only allows products sourced from chickens never-ever given antibiotics their entire lives, including when inside the egg, to be labeled as “No Antibiotics–Ever.”

The Gold’n Plump brand’s transition is gradual to ensure continuous humane, ethical animal care and product availability. GNP Company continues to believe animal antibiotics, when used judiciously and as needed under veterinarian guidance, are safe for animals as well as humans. Yet, it also recognizes consumers’ and customers’ growing desire for choices in the meat case that are raised without antibiotics. Roelofs added, “We will continue to reduce our antibiotics use in response to consumer and customer demand. However, we will continue to treat flocks for illness, including the use of antibiotics when necessary, as withholding treatment is not ethical or humane.”

Humane Care Promise Becomes Certified
As Gold’n Plump products transition to a No Antibiotics–Ever product line, it will also become officially certified by the American Humane Certified farm program. “GNP Company has always been committed to the humane treatment of our chickens,” said Roelofs. “We first partnered with the American Humane Certified farm program in 2010 to certify our Just BARE® products under the program’s rigorous standards. Since 2013, we’ve been auditing our contracted family farm partners and grow-out barns—including those responsible for the care of Gold’n Plump flocks. The official certification of Gold’n Plump formalizes our already steadfast belief in humane care.”

For products to display the American Humane Certified seal, GNP Company’s animal care, handling and processing practices are independently, third party audited and must meet or exceed the agency’s more than 200 rigorous requirements.

A majority of core Gold’n Plump products, such as small and family packs of boneless skinless chicken breasts, chicken thighs and ground chicken, will carry both the No Antibiotics–Ever claim and American Humane Certified seal by summer 2016. All remaining Gold’n Plump value-added retail, deli and foodservice products will transition by the end of 2019.

Extensive media and in-store support will help drive awareness for this Gold’n Plump product line transition in select markets. A mix of advertising will run via print, online, mobile, video and radio channels. Gold’n Plump messaging will be shared among social media platforms, including FacebookTwitter and Pinterest. Point-of-sale shelf-talker materials will deliver the news in-store.

New World Pasta Brands Earn Non-GMO Project Verification

In response to consumers’ desire to make more informed choices about whether to eat foods which are made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs), New World Pasta Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Ebro Foods, announced that its brands: American Beauty®, San Giorgio®, Ronzoni®, Creamette®, Prince® and Skinner® have earned NonGMO Project Verification on their most popular pasta products.

“Today’s consumer is demanding transparency in food labels. Simply put, consumers want to know not just what’s in their food but also where it comes from,” said Paul Galvani, Senior Vice President of Marketing for New World Pasta. “We are proud to be leading the way in the pasta category by earning Non-GMO Project Verification.”

Over 200 pasta products from Ronzoni, Creamette, San Giorgio, American Beauty, Prince and Skinner will carry the new verification seal. New World Pasta products bearing the Non-GMO Project Verified logo began appearing on shelves in 2016. The Non-GMO Project seal is the most trusted sign that a product is produced through best practices for GMO avoidance.

The pasta brands from which New World Pasta formed are built upon a firm commitment to quality and value. The brands began as family-run companies, some more than a century old, and the principles that helped garner their intense customer loyalty are the same principles that guide New World Pasta today.

Gluten-Free Trend Hits Peak, Has Room To Diversify

 

By Greg Gonzales

Gluten-free dog food, signs for gluten-free haircuts and even gluten-free lap dances are some of the jokes floating around these days, but the gluten-free market is serious business. Gluten-free options are everywhere now, and they’re not going away anytime soon. Even so, the market is set to shrink a little as a result of high prices and trendy eaters quitting the diet.

Research from NPD Group revealed that most consumers see gluten free as a fad, while they still seek natural, wholesome products. In addition, Packaged Facts reported that 53 percent of shoppers consider gluten-free foods overpriced, while 41 percent said they’d purchase gluten-free items if they were more affordable.

Though the trend may be at a peak, there’s plenty of support for the market. According to research from Mintel, 37 percent of consumers eat gluten free because they consider it good for overall health. Fifteen percent of U.S. consumers in a Nielsen survey said gluten free is a very important factor in purchasing decisions.

“The gluten-free trend is not disappearing,” said Kim Holman, Marketing Director of Wixon. “However, we are seeing a greater emphasis on transparency and consumers being able to easily identify gluten-free products on the shelves versus new formulations of gluten-free products.” Plus, consumers are increasingly expecting to know where their food came from, how it was made and if the product offers extra nutrition. Meanwhile, food producers are still moving to add “gluten free” to their labels. “When a formula is already gluten free or contains easily removable gluten, we are seeing many of our customers deciding to make the move to gluten free in order to be able to put the claim on their packaging,” Holman said.

Moreover, 80 percent of respondents in a global Nielsen market research survey said they’re willing to pay more for foods with health attributes, and the Mintel research showed that 26 percent of consumers believe gluten-free foods are worth the price bump. Not everyone in that group, however, has reason to believe gluten-free items are for them. “Consumers are making choices for their lifestyle, the way they want to live,” said Holman. “Consumers are looking for foods that eliminate unneeded and unwanted ingredients, and gluten is one of those ingredients for many people. I do think the trend may be peaking, as almost all research firms are declaring. And why is it peaking? Because eliminating gluten does not cure everything.”

According to Holman, stories of medical miracles spreading through social media were what drove the trend. “Stories of medical miracles made people believe that a gluten-free diet was best and gluten was the devil,” she said. Consumers and experts alike are calling those stories misguided.

Gluten free is a trend for the majority, but the diet and products are a legitimate medical need for at least seven percent of the population, if not much more. An estimated one percent of the population has celiac disease, and anywhere from 0.5 percent to 70 percent of the population could be non-celiac gluten-sensitive, according to Dr. Allesio Fasano, Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital.

“Fifteen years ago, people didn’t know how to spell gluten,” Fasano said. “Now, in 2015, the pendulum has swung way over … any comedian includes gluten in their acts. People understand what it is, and it’s one of the most popular markets in the United States. The pendulum will come back a little bit, but not like the other diet trends; this diet is also driven by a real medical necessity and [that] will continue to drive the market.”

Fasano added that a gluten-free diet is a medical intervention, and that anyone considering going gluten free should seek advice from a dietitian. “You don’t inject yourself with insulin and then ask if you have diabetes or not,” he said. “Don’t give it a try just because someone told you that you have symptoms, and don’t do this by yourself.”

As new health research is released and gluten myth-busting becomes more visible — such as Fasano’s December 18 article in the Washington Post — consumers who don’t see results and expect transparency from companies are turning away from gluten-free foods. And until medical researchers like Fasano figure out how to diagnose non-celiac gluten sensitivities, gluten-free foods are potentially a necessity for anywhere from 1.5 percent to 70 percent of the population. While that’s being figured out, people have some diet choices to consider.

“The vendors need to let them know how things are done, to give the consumer a choice,” said Barry Novick, President of Kitchen Table Bakers. “You’re going to see free-from trends continue; that’s very very important. What is natural? Is baking in an oven natural? Is baking in a microwave natural? The consumer should know how the product is made. We have a patient’s bill of rights, and I believe the consumer should have a bill of rights.”

Novick identified poor nutrition content and low quality as reasons people are moving away from gluten-free products. In the rush to formulate products that taste like their gluten-containing counterparts, many of those products failed to measure up in taste and texture.

“If the product is good, it should diversify,” said Novick. “If it’s just gluten free because that’s what people made, it’s going to end up in the same position as the low-carb fad products,” adding that companies are finding success using real people for tasting, and not just formulas, to mimic gluten.

Chris Licata, President and CEO of Blake’s All Natural, reiterated Novick’s point: “I think the products and the brands that are truly committed to making super-high-quality gluten-free meals will continue to grow. There’s a reason why we don’t have 10 or 12 gluten-free items; that’s because if we make a gluten-free item, it truly has to be as good as a similar item that’s not gluten free. It’s not enough to just have it be labeled gluten free; it has to have taste, texture and flavors that are comparable.”

Novick said his gluten-free products, cheese crisps, work because everyone can enjoy them, that, “You need something universal, that the kids can eat and the parents can have with a glass of wine.… Wherever you go, whatever your diet, you can have our product at the party. You’re never left out.”

With so much time, effort and dollar amounts spent on adding gluten-free options to their lineups, producers within the industry won’t be taking the label off their products. And continued and increased consumer interest in free-from and natural products, nutrient-dense superfoods, along with the many alternatives to gluten, leaves room for the market to grow.

“Many manufacturers want the added value of being gluten free and a small additional cost, but in the end, consumers will decide if gluten free stays or goes,” Wixon food scientist Renee Santy said. “They will speak with their wallet. In the meantime, companies need to stay in touch with their customers and understand their changing needs around gluten free.”

“Many consumers had hoped that gluten free would help them lose weight or help some medical issue. When this does not transpire, they will lose interest in gluten free,” Santy added. “But those consumers, that just feel better because they live gluten free, will continue to live gluten free.”

An earlier version of this story misattributed a quote from Kim Holman to Renee Santy. This story has been updated to correct the attribution.

 

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