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Pereg Natural Food’s Banana Flour Now Available

banana-flourPereg Natural Food’s Banana Flour was recognized with a SIAL Innovation Award, as one of the most innovative products around the world.

This flour is made from 100 percent ripe, yellow bananas and makes an amazing gluten-free alternative flour for baking way more than just banana bread. It’s Non-GMO Project verified, gluten free, vegan, and kosher.

Like all of Pereg’s alternative flours, this is packed in a stay-fresh zip-top pouch, for easy pouring and resealing without the flour clogging up the zipper. Pereg Natural Foods offers a wide range of alternative flours in addition to this Banana Flour: there’s also Almond Meal, Buckwheat Flour, Chickpea Flour, Coconut Flour, Farro Flour and Quinoa Flour. Each has its own unique features perfect for all cooking and baking needs.

Pereg Natural Foods Introduces Kaniwa

Pereg Natural Foods will introduce kañiwa – also known as baby quinoa, at the upcoming Kosherfest trade show, November 15-16, 2016 at the Meadowlands Expo Center in Secaucus, New Jersey.

Kañiwa is an excellent source of complete protein and amino acids, is exceptionally high in iron and is gluten-free. It’s dark reddish-brown in color and about half the size of a tiny quinoa seed. It cooks up quickly to resemble a smaller version of red quinoa.

Unlike regular quinoa, kañiwa doesn’t have saponins, the coating that gives quinoa a somewhat soapy, slightly bitter flavor if not rinsed properly, so it’s actually easier to process. (Note that all quinoa from Pereg is pre-rinsed and ready to cook from the package.) Another advantage kañiwa has over quinoa is that it’s an even better source of iron.

According to Gill Schneider, CEO of Pereg Natural Foods, “This mighty little ancient grain cooks up with a crunchy texture, and offers a nutrient rich food for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We are excited to bring consumers yet another healthy choice to serve to friends and family, from our family-owned Pereg Natural Foods business.”

Kañiwa from Pereg Natural Foods is all natural, gluten-free, Non-GMO Project verified, vegan, OU and CRC kosher-certified, and produced in the USA. It is available in 5-ounce boxes ($3.57) and re-sealable 16-ounce bags ($5.50).

Dream Non-Dairy Yogurts Non-GMO Project Verified

All flavors of Dream® Non-Dairy Yogurt have earned verification from the Non-GMO Project. These products include Almond Dream® and Coconut Dream™ refrigerated non-dairy yogurts that contain live and active cultures. Available in a wide range of flavors including Vanilla, Strawberry and Mixed Berry, they provide a solution for consumers seeking a dairy-, gluten- and/or soy- free lifestyle or for those who just want to enjoy these delicious flavored yogurts.

“Dream Non-Dairy Yogurts have always been made with high quality ingredients, and the verification from the Non-GMO Project provides an additional level of assurance to our consumers and customers,” said Basel Nassar, Chief Operating Officer of Hain Refrigerated Foods Division. “The Non-GMO Project is such a trusted organization and provides a rigorous approval process from ingredient sourcing through manufacturing to ensure that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not intentionally added to products. We are proud to carry their seal on our products.”

Bob’s Red Mill Introduces Gluten Free Egg Replacer

Bob’s Red Mill, which has been producing whole grain and gluten free foods for more than 40 years, has developed a new Gluten Free Egg Replacer that, in addition to containing no gluten or animal products, is also without soy, corn, grains, or beans. The new Gluten Free Egg Replacer substitutes for whole eggs in recipes such as cakes, muffins, quick breads, brownies and pancakes. The new formula, which makes use of only four simple ingredients, is available in a re-sealable standup pouch and has a 24-month shelf life. Each 12-ounce package contains the equivalent of 34 eggs.

“We believe everyone should be able to enjoy the simple pleasures of a wholesome, homemade baked good, no matter what foods they are trying to avoid,” said Bob Moore, Founder, President and CEO of employee-owned Bob’s Red Mill. “Now, with the help of our Gluten Free Egg Replacer, bakers can still have their favorite banana bread or buckwheat pancake.”

The new Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Egg Replacer, which retails for $4.49 for a 12-ounce bag, is a blend of potato starch, tapioca flour, baking soda, and psyllium husk fiber. While the company has offered its Vegetarian Egg Replacer for a number of years, this new egg replacer is the first such product it has offered that is made without gluten or soy ingredients.

“We’re delighted to offer this Gluten Free Egg Replacer so that even more of our consumers can experience the joy of baking,” said Matthew Cox, Vice President of Marketing at Bob’s Red Mill. “Now, vegans, those with gluten or soy issues, or really anyone who wants a reliable baking staple stocked in their pantry can turn to this Egg Replacer and whip up a favorite recipe in a safe and easy way.”

As with all of Bob’s Red Mill’s gluten free products, the Gluten Free Egg Replacer adheres to strict gluten free safety standards, including being produced in a 100 percent dedicated gluten free facility and ELISA tested to verify gluten free integrity.
Bob’s Red Mill Egg Replacer is available now to retailers in cases of eight, as well as online at www.bobsredmill.com.

Bob’s Red Mill Introduces New Gluten Free Egg Replacer

Bob’s Red Mill, which has been producing whole grain and gluten free foods for more than 40 years, has developed a new Gluten Free Egg Replacer that, in addition to containing no gluten or animal products, is also without soy, corn, grains, or beans. The new Gluten Free Egg Replacer substitutes for whole eggs in recipes such as cakes, muffins, quick breads, brownies and pancakes. The new formula, which makes use of only four simple ingredients, is available in a re-sealable standup pouch and has a 24-month shelf life. Each 12-ounce package contains the equivalent of 34 eggs.

“We believe everyone should be able to enjoy the simple pleasures of a wholesome, homemade baked good, no matter what foods they are trying to avoid,” said Bob Moore, Founder, President and CEO of employee-owned Bob’s Red Mill. “Now, with the help of our Gluten Free Egg Replacer, bakers can still have their favorite banana bread or buckwheat pancake.”

The new Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Egg Replacer, which retails for $4.49 for a 12-ounce bag, is a blend of potato starch, tapioca flour, baking soda, and psyllium husk fiber. While the company has offered its Vegetarian Egg Replacer for a number of years, this new egg replacer is the first such product it has offered that is made without gluten or soy ingredients.

“We’re delighted to offer this Gluten Free Egg Replacer so that even more of our consumers can experience the joy of baking,” said Matthew Cox, Vice President of Marketing at Bob’s Red Mill. “Now, vegans, those with gluten or soy issues, or really anyone who wants a reliable baking staple stocked in their pantry can turn to this Egg Replacer and whip up a favorite recipe in a safe and easy way.”

As with all of Bob’s Red Mill’s gluten free products, the Gluten Free Egg Replacer adheres to strict gluten free safety standards, including being produced in a 100 percent dedicated gluten free facility and ELISA tested to verify gluten free integrity.

Bob’s Red Mill Egg Replacer is available now to retailers in cases of eight, as well as online at www.bobsredmill.com.

New Study Reveals More Americans Embracing Plant-Based, Organic and Non-GMO Foods

More grocery shoppers are trying dairy- and meat-free alternatives, according to a new national health food study by Earth Balance, which makes a line of vegan buttery spreads, nut butters, dressings and snacks. Two thousand consumers were polled for the study, which looked at which new foods they’re trying, their top motivators and trends in healthy eating.

When asked which factors are most important to them when shopping for food, respondents said buying local (37 percent), organic (33 percent) and non-GMO (30 percent) are key. Additionally, Americans are more willing to try better-for-you-foods, with the study showing the most-tried are healthy snacks, dairy alternatives and oil alternatives.

Dairy alternatives have been tried by 29 percent of respondents. Superfoods (e.g., chia, acai and quinoa), alternative snacks (e.g., gluten-free crackers, nut butters and Greek yogurt) and alternative oils (e.g., avocado, coconut and sunflower) have been tried by 28 percent of respondents, and 18 percent have tried plant-based proteins, such as hemp hearts, lentils and spirulina.

Almost half, 42 percent, of consumers said they know more about plant-based diets now compared to five years ago, and 43 percent are more likely to try plant-based alternatives today. Thirteen percent also report trying a vegetarian lifestyle.

What’s more, over half said they’ve tried dairy-free alternatives such as dairy-free milk, cheese and yogurt. Sixty-three percent have tried plant-based protein alternatives, with tofu, meatless burgers and meatless hot dogs topping the list.

Boulder Organic! Souping It Up in Colorado

By Lorrie Baumann

Boulder Organic Foods is a fast-growing maker of fresh soups that are sold out of grocers’ refrigerated cases. “We started here locally in Boulder [Colorado] in a handful of stores, and today we’re in more than 2,000 stores nationwide in pretty much every major market in the country,” said CEO Greg Powers. “We are a dedicated organic, gluten free and non-GMO company. Everything we produce reflects those three attributes.”

The company was started just seven years ago by Kate Brown, a single mom who was looking for healthier fresh soup options. She made several shopping trips to local stores looking for a gluten-free soup brand that would meet her own dietary needs and that would also meet her goals for the food she wanted to give her daughter. When she didn’t find any, she decided to make her own.

Boulder Organic Green Chile Corn ChowderAfter she began serving her soups to friends and family, one of those friends referred her products to the local Whole Foods store, which asked her to make the soup for sale there. At that point, she put together a business plan and spent a year or two coming up with recipes for commercial quantities of her soups and launched her new food business in early 2009. Powers joined the company several months later. “I joined her having a background in business, and between the two of us, with her passion and talent for cooking and her skills at coming up with new recipes, and my background in business, we built this company,” he said. “We’ve doubled our size every year since we began. It’s fast growth, but it’s also thoughtful growth. We’ve been very sure to keep the same quality, working with many of the same suppliers we worked with when we started years ago.”

Today, the company makes eight to 12 different soups at any given time – a core set that includes Roasted Tomato Basil, Garden Minestrone, Potato Leek, Red Lentil Dahl and Golden Quinoa and Kale soups, along with a rotating list of seasonal offerings in its SQF level 3 plant in Boulder, Colorado. Three new soups – Tomato Bisque, Broccoli Cheddar and Bacon Potato Corn Chowder – are launching early this month in Target stores.

Boulder Organic! packages most of its soups in 24-ounce containers. The serving size is identified as eight ounces, which works when it’s served as a side dish, but most people will want a bit more than that if they’re eating it as an entree, so in practice, most consumers will regard the 24-ounce container as enough to feed two people, Powers said. For club stores, the 24-ounce containers are bundled into a 2-pack, and Target carries a 16-ounce container.

While some of the Boulder Organic! soups are mostly vegetables with chicken stock in the base, many are vegetarian and a few include animal protein along with the vegetables. The heavy emphasis on vegetables in the ingredient deck is partly a response to the local market in Boulder, Powers said. “We have a very active vegetarian community in Boulder. For our little market, it was a good fit. It was a good way to start the company and produce products that would fit with our community.”

The company maintains its commitment to being a socially responsible woman-owned business, and 2 percent of its production is donated to a local food bank. “We try to treat all of our employees fairly and we have a very flat organizational structure,” Powers said. Employees are paid a living wage, and the company’s operations are zero waste, with everything that isn’t used up being composted or recycled. “We’re constantly looking for ways to reduce our environmental footprint further,” Powers said. “We also take food safety very seriously.”

Explore Cuisine to Launch Gluten Free Pad Thai Noodles

Explore Cuisine will be launching its new Thai Rice Noodles at Expo East 2016.  There are two varieties.

Brown rice noodlesBrown Rice Pad Thai Noodles are made with organic, nutrient-rich whole grains. Brown Rice Pad Thai Noodles take the guesswork out of gluten-free Asian cooking by providing you with Pad Thai Noodles that are perfectly packed in a 2-ounce package.

Red Rice Pad Thai Noodles utilize nutritious red rice grain for authentic texture. Explore Cuisine’s Red Rice Pad Thai Noodles are a healthy alternative to traditional Pad Thai. With 4g of protein, this three-ingredient Pad Thai pasta is made with whole foods directly from the farm.

These pastas are certified organic and vegan, non-GMO and gluten free. They’re high in protein and fiber.

Against the Grain: Plant-Based Without Compromise

For 10 years, Against The Grain has been going against the trend towards food industrialization. It combines the highest quality, whole ingredients in unique ways to produce naturally gluten-free, minimally-processed products. It doesn’t compromise in taste and texture either.

Plant-based products are a new departure for Against The Grain. Its best-selling gluten-free bread and pizza products have always relied on animal protein, but when faced with the opportunity to develop a new line of products, it asked, why not create a plant-based product that was both gluten-free and grain-free? The new 100 percent plant-based Ginger Cookies and Chocolate Chip Cookies are just that. They are rich and buttery-tasting, soft and chewy, and made with real ingredients and no gums, binders, emulsifiers or preservatives. What it offers is a very satisfying, responsible indulgence that is easier on the planet.

About Against The Grain Gourmet
Against The Grain Gourmet is a celiac family-owned wholesale manufacturer of frozen gluten-free bread, pizza and cookie products located in Brattleboro, Vermont. It is also the only national gluten-free and grain-free bakery. The company’s products are made with a minimal number of ingredients with no preservatives or additives in its dedicated gluten-free and nut-free facility. It prides itself on paying its production staff the highest wages and the best benefits package in the industry.

Plant-Based Protein Products Projected to Continue Market Growth

By Greg Gonzales

Ask vegans where they get their protein these days, and eyes are sure to roll. Consumers, especially millennials, are adding more plant-based proteins to their diet than ever before. Their reasons vary, but tend to include health, sustainability and ethical concerns. “At the current trends of food consumption and environmental changes, food security and food sustainability are on a collision course,” says a 2014 American Society for Nutrition study. “Policies in favor of the global adoption of plant-based diets will simultaneously optimize the food supply, health, environmental and social justice outcomes for the world’s population.” Whatever their reasons for incorporating more plant-based protein into their diets, plant-based alternatives are one of the biggest trends this year.

According to Mintel’s 2016 Global Food and Drink Trends report, the increase in novel protein sources appeals to a wider variety of consumers, and indicates that the “alternative” marketplace might take over the mainstream animal-based market. As early as 2013, Mintel reported that more than one-third of U.S. consumers had purchased a meat alternative such as Tofurky or Beyond Meat. Seventy percent of Millennials consume meat alternatives a few times a week, with one-third of them consuming a meat alternative daily.

Some of them are switching to plant-based diets, or not eating as much meat, as a health choice. Recent research from the World Health Organization and other institutions have linked processed meat and red meat consumption to colon cancer, and other forms of cancer. Meat is also rich in saturated fats and sodium, which is bad for heart health when it dominates the diet. According to a Harvard study, replacing these fat-rich meats with foods rich in polyunsaturated fats, like nuts or seeds, reduced heart disease risk by 19 percent. Another study, from Imperial College London, showed that reduced meat consumption also helps prevent obesity in the long term. In addition, a look at the nutrition facts on meat versus peas or beans shows that the latter can provide more fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals without the extra fat the former adds. Reducing meat intake and substituting vegetables provides all the daily dietary requirements.

Consumers have also reduced their meat intake in the name of animal welfare and environment. For example, more than 8 billion chickens were slaughtered for meat in 2014, most of them living in cages too small to move around in. Some argue that this kind of pain and suffering of the animals is enough for them to make the switch, though consumers might also point to environmental factors as well. Chef and Restaurateur Dan Barber writes in his book, “The Third Plate,” that “Fixtures of agribusiness such as five-thousand-acre grain monocultures and bloated animal feedlots are no more the future of farming than eighteenth-century factories billowing black smoke are the future of manufacturing.” Barber argues in interviews, books and Ted Talks that agriculture, cooking and nature go hand-in-hand, that foods produced along with the local ecosystem are sustainable and even taste better.

Reasons for eating more plants and less meat aside, available alternatives to animal proteins run the gamut of protein sources. Quorn‘s patties and strips get their protein from a fungus to mimic the taste and texture of chicken, while Gardein’s formulation for chicken, fish and burgers do the same using vital wheat gluten. Beyond Meat’s products use a variety of sources, including pea protein, to mimic meats like chicken and beef. Vegans can still enjoy their morning eggs with Follow Your Heart’s VeganEgg, a completely vegan egg product made from algae that cooks up in a pan just like the real thing. Bean burgers, mushrooms, jackfruit, tempeh, tofu, seitan and texturized vegetable protein are just some of the other ways consumers are pushing meat proteins further off their plates. From Paleo to vegan and gluten-free, there’s something for every individual.
“People need the information so they can make their choice, even in the space of non-meat proteins,” said Minh Tsai, Founder and CEO of Hodo Soy. “Even now, there’s a lot of choices. With information, both in terms of what it tastes like and what the ingredients are, customers will have that info and make the right choice when it comes to taste, and when it comes to health.”

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