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Macfrut Discusses Agriculture as a Solution to Human Trafficking

At the Rimini Expo Centre, Macfrut opened exceptionally well. Discussions started with the presentation of the Green House project, implemented in Ghana by VIS (International Volunteer Service for Development), an NGO that collaborates with the Salesian Congregation in Italy involved in the “Stop Tratta” (Stop Trafficking) campaign. “The focus session was dedicated to the great ideas launched by the agricultural sector to create prospects for future development,” said Renzo Piraccini, President of Macfrut.

Nico Lotta, President of VIS, explained the whole operation involving training in eco-sustainable agriculture as a feasible alternative in order to discourage migrants from leaving on boats and human trafficking. The didactic greenhouse was built in Ghana to allow teachers and young people to be trained with an alternative technique to the agricultural practice applied in many African states, which has tremendous consequences for rainforests, so that sustainable development can be ensured.
“We appeal to young people, potential migrants or returning migrants because we want them to understand that there are opportunities in their countries, in particular involving land and agriculture. Working even just with a few people is crucial, and we want to make sure these youngsters have the opportunity to choose,” Lotta said. The President of Idromeccanica Lucchini also gave a speech during the conference, illustrating the technological potential of a sustainable greenhouse, such as the one used by the Green House project in Ghana.

The Italian Undersecretary of State for European Affairs, MP Sandro Gozi, congratulated VIS and highlighted the importance of a project such as “Green House.” In fact, it is not only a symbol of Italian excellence but also the right approach to address the migration issue in the countries of origin. “These are simple and ingenious ideas that can make a difference in cooperation and development.”

Forum on Asian and Middle Eastern Markets
India, China and the UAE: these are all growing markets that are strongly inclined to import quality fruit. This was the key theme of the Asia & Middle East Conference, organised by Eurofresh Distribution.

During the meeting, the trends, marketing opportunities, limitations and recommendations in trading with the Asian and Middle Eastern markets were outlined. These markets all show an ever-increasing demand for imported fruit and vegetables, where consumers see their purchasing power grow and product quality becomes increasingly important.

Ahmed Alì, head of procurement of the Danube Supermarkets chain, and James Varghese, Purchase Manager of Elite Agro LCC, pointed out the positive trend in the UAE fresh produce market, which demands high quality and an efficient service.
Hitin Suri, Managing Director of Suri Agrofresh, illustrated the opportunities of the Indian market, which has a rapidly growing GDP, a boom in health trends and an interest in new varieties. Simona Rubbi of the CSO (Centro Servizi Ortofrutticoli) cooperative of Ferrara also intervened to highlight the need for European coordination on the export of fruit and vegetable produce to Asian countries. To conclude, Mike Li of CR Vanguard, George Liu of Fruta Cloud and Paul Sheh of Hema Supermarket gave an overview of China’s situation, where e-commerce is becoming increasingly popular also in the fresh produce sector.

Innovative Companies Awarded with Macfrut Innovation Award
A total of 36 innovations were awarded with the Macfrut Innovation Award (MIA) 2017 during a ceremony organized by Cesena Fiera in partnership for the third year in a row with L’Informatore Agrario, the weekly publication for professional farmers. Innovation, environmental and economic sustainability and improvement in product quality: these are the criteria used by a panel of experts to review the over 80 applications submitted by Italian and foreign companies for the eight award sections. Altogether nine gold, 15 silver and 12 bronze medals were awarded.

About Macfrut
Macfrut is organized by Cesena Fiera and held at the Rimini Expo Centre on May 10-12, 2017.

SaltWorks Inc. Warns Retailers of Influx of Lower Quality Himalayan Salt

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SaltWorks-Himalayan-Bulk-Bag-FamilySaltWorks® CEO Mark Zoske is warning retailers and wholesale buyers that an influx of lower cost, poorly processed, low-quality Himalayan pink salt has infiltrated the market, putting businesses and consumers at risk.

Prized for its beautiful gradient of color, trace mineral content and delicious flavor, Himalayan salt has exploded in popularity, especially as consumers seek all-natural salts that contains no artificial additives.

Responding to the increased demand, commodity importers have introduced poorly processed mineral salt that may contain undesirable and potentially harmful insoluble materials, such as dust, dirt, clay, stone, rocks or even plastic and metal fragments.

“Some larger retailers are pressuring suppliers to reduce costs. Using under-processed salt has become the only way to meet their price targets. This can have serious consequences,” said Zoske. “Ultimately, we’re concerned that this low-quality salt will trigger a recall. It will jeopardize consumers’ perceptions of this incredible, flavorful and versatile salt, because it contains stuff that isn’t salt, doesn’t taste as good, or work as well in their shakers and grinders.”

SaltWorks is a leading supplier of high-quality all-natural Himalayan pink salt. The company produces its own Ancient Ocean® and Artisan® Salt Company brands for retail and wholesale customers, and supplies bulk Himalayan salt to manufacturers, food processors and private label customers.

SaltWorks urges commercial buyers to ask their Himalayan salt suppliers about their quality benchmarks, processing facilities and exactly how the salt is processed.

It is important for buyers and consumers to conduct simple visual and taste tests, according to the company. Correctly processed high-quality Himalayan salt will range in color from light white to shades of pink and red. Every crystal should be translucent. Salt grains that are opaque red, white, gray and brown are inedible clay, stone or other materials.

The flavor should be salt-forward with a slight but distinct minerality. Gritty textures and a clay-like flavor indicate a lower-quality salt that includes impurities.

SaltWorks has engineered a chemical-free salt processing system with built-in redundancies to ensure that the salts it produces and sells are among the cleanest, safest and highest quality available.

This proprietary processing system includes sifters, aspirators, rare-earth magnets, metal detection and the company’s own highly advanced Optically Clean® color sorting technology.

SaltWorks-ancient-ocean-himalayan-pink-salt-mediumUnlike older technology commonly used in the salt industry, Optically Clean analyzes salt grains in free flow using the full color spectrum with advanced HD cameras. Each grain is compared to SaltWorks’ stringent quality specifications. Optically Clean identifies materials that blend in with the salt but are inedible, like rock and clay particles. These materials, as well as grains that do not meet SaltWorks’ strict standards, are removed with a burst of air.

“We process all of our salts in our state-of-the-art facility in the United States. We’ve implemented multiple steps and QA checks along the way to ensure we are supplying the cleanest, safest, food-grade all-natural salt available,” said Zoske. “We never cut corners on our supply chain, equipment, processes or packaging.”

Discover the SaltWorks’ Himalayan salt processing difference and explore its all-natural salt selection online at www.seasalt.com/wholesale/best-himalayan-salt-processing.

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Chobani Accepting Applications for Specialty Food Incubator Class

Chobani, LLC will launch a second incubator class following the success of its inaugural program. Applications are now being accepted through June 4, 2017.

Chobani’s founder and CEO, Hamdi Ulukaya, launched the Chobani Food Incubator in 2016 to support food entrepreneurs aiming to challenge the food industry, improve broken systems and bring better food to more people—principles through which Chobani was founded.

“People are rejecting the way Big Food is doing things,” said Hamdi Ulukaya, Founder and CEO, Chobani. “It’s creating a special moment for food start-ups with big hearts and big ideas to challenge how things are done. We’re searching for entrepreneurs who are passionate about getting more natural, more accessible and more creative foods out there, and who are driven by a purpose and mission to make the world better.”

The class will run from September 2017 to December 2017, based out of a dedicated space designed for the Incubator at Chobani’s sales and marketing offices in New York, New York.

The Chobani Food Incubator’s inaugural class concluded its six-month program in March 2017 with six startup brand graduates: Banza®, Chops Snacks, Cissé Cocoa Co, Jar Goods®, Kettle & Fire, and MISFIT Juicery. During that period, the group registered a combined total revenue of $3 million in 2017 alone (YTD) and an increase of 60 percent in distribution, expanded their product portfolios, increased employee headcounts and established new relationships with national retailers.

Applicants will be asked to electronically submit information about their products along with a short video and biographical information by June 4, 2017. Chobani plans to notify accepted applicants in mid-July.

Applications and additional information is available at chobanifoodincubator.com

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