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Study Reaffirms That U.S. Caffeine Consumption Remains Stable, Caffeine From Soda Declines

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published by The American Academy of Pediatrics, shows that caffeine intake in the United States has remained stable throughout the last decade. Moreover, children and adolescents consume less caffeine than they have in previous years.

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This study’s findings are consistent with an analysis commissioned by FDA (updated in 2012), as well as a published International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) survey of more than 37,000 people, showing that caffeine consumption in the U.S. has remained stable during the most recent period analyzed.

Moreover, while energy drink consumption by children and adolescents continues to be a prevalent topic in mainstream media, it is important to note that this study’s data shows virtually no caffeine consumption from energy drinks among children under 12 and extremely low consumption for adolescents aged 12 to 18.

Here are a few facts from today’s CDC study:

SODA: Data from 1999-2000 shows that soda accounted for 62 percent of total caffeine intake; the most recent data shows soda decreased by nearly half to 38 percent of total caffeine intake.
COFFEE: Data from 1999-2000 shows that coffee accounted for 10 percent of caffeine intake; the most recent data shows that coffee accounts for a growing 24 percent of total caffeine intake.
ENERGY DRINKS: Energy drinks were not measured in 1999-2000; the most recent data shows that energy drinks account for only six percent of caffeine intake.